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A-Track Online Subject Courses

Instructor: Duygu Gürsel
Language of instruction:
English
Course type:
Online subject course, A-Track
Contact hours:
The coursework corresponds to an on-site course in term II amounting to 72 contact hours.
Course days
: Monday & Thursday
Time:
4 pm - 8:30 pm CEST
ECTS credits
: 7
Course fee:
€ 1,200 (incl. online discount)
Can be combined with all B-Track online courses

Course Description

Regarding transnational migration, the EU promotes a political reasoning between processes of consolidation and necessary conflict, between sovereignty and shared responsibility, between the right to define and delimit and the duty to negotiate. In ongoing economic crisis and facing unprecedented movements of people, the timeless normalcy of migration is often framed as crisis per se.

As the visibility of migration increases in various ways, migrants are often represented and imagined as a homogenous mass of ‘the other’. This leads to a problematic understanding of migration as something to be controlled and governed from a top-down perspective alone. But the respective processes of negotiation on migration policy, within and across the outer borders of the Union, take place not only between the official institutions of nation-states, but on all scales of European populations. They also take place from a bottom-up perspective in the centers and at the margins of societies alike.

Departing from diverse theories of migration, we will gain an overview of EU-level migration polity and recent migration- and border-management policies. We will analyze the conflicts, debates and discourses around the last years of increased immigration.

Scaling down, we will engage with the local authorities’ perspective in Berlin. Diving deeper down we will start to change perspective: How do local activists develop and implement their own ways of welcoming migrants? Is there a rising anti-Muslim racism in Europe? How can we think on recent migrations taking gender and sexuality into consideration? Where do migrants work and how are they represented in trade unions? Finally, focusing on the history of migrant struggles in Berlin, we will encounter migrants’ viewpoints, which reach beyond the usual framings of ‘the poor migrant’ as ‘passive victim’, as a threat or as the ‘(anti-)hero’ of globalization. We will encounter viewpoints on the conflicts, compromises, resistances, solidarity and social transformation shaping and shaped by recent migration movement to Europe.

Download Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)

Instructor: Dr. Sven Rücker
Language of instruction:
English
Course type:
Online subject course, A-Track
Contact hours:
The coursework corresponds to an on-site course in term II amounting to 72 contact hours.
Course days
: Monday & Thursday
Time:
4 pm - 8:30 pm CEST
ECTS credits
: 7
Course fee:
€ 1,200 (incl. online discount)
Can be combined with all B-Track online courses

Course Description

There are many reasons for the global success of football. The game fulfils our longing for triumph and endorses our knowledge of failure. It produces heroes and losers, demonstrates that we have to fight to reach our aims, but also shows the importance of cooperating and interacting. Thus football acts as a theatre of existence, in which life can both mirror and transcend itself.

The class will take a look behind the scenes and identify the mechanisms that make football so popular. They lie partly in the game’s structure itself, partly in its connection to other cultural fields, like religion, or war.

We will also take a look at the European Championship, that is happening during our class. This gives us the opportunity to review and test our theories about football. We will watch parts of the games and analyze them.

Because football is a game that is always “more than just a game”, it is an appropriate subject for philosophy and cultural studies. At first sight, of course, this relation seems to be counterintuitive. Traditionally, particularly philosophy was defined as a purely mental activity while football in reverse was reduced to a physical combat game. But we will see that one of the characteristics of modern philosophy is to involve the body in the process of thinking, while football urges a specific intelligence from its players. Thus, the class will explore the cultural and philosophical references of football and vice versa, the ludic and bodily aspects of philosophy. By this, we will gain a new perspective on football as well as on philosophy. In addition to that, the focusing on the specific subject “football” can show the different approaches as well as the overlaps between the individual sciences.

Download Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)

Instructor: Isabelle Demangeat
Language of instruction:
English
Course type:
Online subject course, A-Track
Contact hours:
The coursework corresponds to an on-site course in term II amounting to 72 contact hours.
Course days
: Monday & Thursday
Time:
4 pm - 8:30 pm CEST
ECTS credits
: 7
Course fee:
€ 1,200 (incl. online discount)
Can be combined with all B-Track online courses

Course Description

Cross-cultural competency and collaboration are among the soft skills that employers seek most. The pandemic is expected to have a lasting effect on the future of work and will only increase the importance of these skills and their application to remote scenarios, as a higher percentage of workers will continue to work remotely at least part time and innovative meeting tools gain popularity over some forms of business travel.

This class conveys knowledge generated from the analysis of the professional reality of billions: daily working from home or a shared office space with other individuals spread around the world. Two principles emerge: 1) Cross-cultural competency and inclusiveness are key for high-quality collaboration in dispersed teams – this is true of both the business world and academia. 2) Online communication is a form of interpersonal communication.
Based on these two principles, this course examines how communication theories apply to dispersed teams and internet-based connections. It explores how to build up cross-cultural skills from a distance.
In this context, best practices from international corporations and not-for-profit organizations are analyzed; communication skills for different cultural settings explained and trained.

The class will be a temporary learning system in which participants experience being part of a dispersed team, analyze their experience of collaboration with fellow international students, and work together in small groups to create and present a collaborative work to their peers and the instructor. The class replicates the processes of a dispersed professional team: building up trust, generating common knowledge, enhancing cross-cultural competency, creating inclusiveness and delivering shared results.

Students will be provided with theoretical knowledge and with experimental learning opportunities. We will examine the fundamentals required for inclusiveness in a cross-cultural and diverse group. Over the course of the term, students will learn to name and apply relevant communication theories, develop an awareness of the impact of online communication, analyze the findings of cross-cultural surveys, evaluate and categorize different types of diversity and inclusion principles in organizations, practice collaboration in an international team, and reflect on situations from their daily lives where this knowledge can be applied in the future.

Guest speakers will be executives with profound international exposure who will share their key learnings on inclusion, cross-culturality and remote leadership.

Download Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)