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A-Track Online Subject Courses

Instructor: Isabelle Demangeat
Language of instruction:
English
Course type:
Online subject course, A-Track
Contact hours:
The coursework corresponds to an on-site course in term III amounting to 48 contact hours.
Course days
: Monday & Thursday
Time:
8 am - 12:30 pm CEST
ECTS credits
: 5
Course fee:
€ 800 (incl. online discount)
Can be combined with all B-Track online courses

Course Description

Everyone knows how to connect, how to learn, exchange, work and have fun online. But in a professional context we need to develop communication skills which allow to generate the quality of communication and collaboration needed for high quality results in remote teams. In this course, we will examine how cross-cultural competency fuels teamwork in international set-ups, specifically on the East-West intersection of cultural dimensions. The class will be a temporary learning system in which participants experience to be part of a dispersed team, analyze their own learning and experience of collaboration with fellow international students to create and present a collaborative work to their peers and the instructor. The class replicates the process of a dispersed professional team: building up trust, generating common knowledge, enhancing cross-cultural competency, creating inclusiveness and delivering shared results.

Students will be provided with theoretical knowledge and with experimental learning opportunities.

The impact of the pandemic on online interpersonal communication will also be taken into consideration. Over the course of the term, students will learn to name and apply relevant communication theories, develop an awareness of the impact of online communication, extract learnings from cross-cultural communication and inclusion contents, practice collaboration in an international team, and reflect on situations from their daily lives where this knowledge can be applied in the future.
Guest speakers are two executives with profound international exposure who will share their key learnings on inclusion, cross-culturality and remote leadership.

Download Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)

Instructor: Dr. Marcus Funck
Language of instruction:
English
Course type:
Online subject course, A-Track
Contact hours:
The coursework corresponds to an on-site course in term III amounting to 48 contact hours.
Course days
: Monday & Thursday
Time:
4 pm - 8:30 pm CEST
ECTS credits
: 5
Course fee:
€ 800 (incl. online discount)
Can be combined with all B-Track online courses

Course Description

The ‘thousand year Reich’ that Hitler promised when he became Chancellor of Germany in January 1933 lasted but 12 years. During this time, however, Hitler and his Nazi Party came to dominate European and even world affairs, terrorizing vast numbers of Germans, launching a devastating war, and orchestrating the murder of more than five million Jews. Yet Hitler and the Nazi Party gained the active support and involvement of most Germans. How was this possible?

This class focuses on Hitler’s Germany and it begins with the essential 19th century background. How did political anti-Semitism grow there? What shaped the social and political life? Central to this session will be a discussion of the broad political currents and the popular literature that Hitler and many of his supporters read and absorbed.

Crucial to understanding the lure of Hitler and the Nazi Party was Germany’s experience in the First World War, a conflict that decimated a generation and destroyed Europe as it was known. Germany became a democratic state, but was torn by political divisions and dissatisfaction. In this climate of uncertainty and despair, Hitler and the Nazi Party grew from a small group on the radical fringe in Munich to a national force. How did this happen? Those traits of Hitler crucial to his success, particularly his charisma, will be defined and analyzed within the broader political context of Weimar political life.

In late January 1933 Hitler gained the long desired but elusive goal: he became chancellor of Germany, the leader of a coalition government. Much attention will be paid to how Hitler, his cabinet, and supporters were able to consolidate the control over the state and society within a matter of months. This came at the cost of political liberties, through the growing use of terror, oppression, and intimidation. Yet, Hitler gained supporters as he seemingly offered economic stability and a new unity to the German people. How the regime solidified its control over society and political life will be examined and discussed at length in this session.

A key element of Hitler’s rule was the concentration camp system, what came to be a vast chain of prisons and centers of oppression and death. How this developed will be examined and analyzed.

Hitler’s ambitions, the conquest of ‘living space’ in Eastern Europe and the annihilation of the Jews, motivated his foreign ambitions and led directly to World War II, the most destructive conflict in human history. A central element of the war was the Holocaust, the all-out program to destroy the Jews of Europe. The session will examine closely these developments, the nature of the war, how the Holocaust was implemented, and the role that terror played in sustaining Nazi rule. We will also discuss the measures taken against the handicapped, homosexuals, Sinti and Roma.

In Germany and later in occupied Europe opposition and resistance emerged and challenged Nazi rule. Opponents were motivated by a variety of reasons, some personal, some political, and these too will be discussed.

Lastly, the class will examine the end of the war, the so-called ‘zero hour’ in Germany, the destruction and collapse of Germany, and then how this nation has dealt with the legacy of Hitler and Nazi rule.

In this online version of this course visiting websites of museums and memorial sites, getting virtual tours of such places, and speaking with experts working on these sites will be an essential part.

Download Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)

Instructor: Dr. Frieder Otto Wolf
Language of instruction:
English
Course type:
Online subject course, A-Track
Contact hours:
The coursework corresponds to an on-site course in term III amounting to 48 contact hours.
Course days
: Monday & Thursday
Time:
4 pm - 8:30 pm CEST
ECTS credits
: 5
Course fee:
€ 800 (incl. online discount)
Can be combined with all B-Track online courses

Course Description

Philosophy has constituted a central element in the emergence of modern German culture. In the late 18th century, German philosophy participated in the broader European Enlightenment culture, which was in turn connected to the development of modern empirical science. Under the impression of the historical changes brought about by the French Revolution and by the ‘Industrial Revolution’ in Great Britain, a special constellation of German philosophy emerged at the end of the 18th century, which has deeply left its mark on subsequent philosophical thinking far beyond Germany.

This philosophy course addresses the historical reality of this ‘German moment of philosophy’ in two subsequent phases: In the first part, we follow the emergence and full deployment of German philosophy from its Kantian beginnings to Hegel’s grand but fragile synthesis, trying to understand its richness as well as its fragility. In a second part, we discuss the later renewal of German philosophy in the late 19th century and its historical tragedy in the 20th century. This will include a discussion of the new beginnings of philosophy since the mid-19th century, from Marx, and Nietzsche, via Frege to Husserl and Wittgenstein, who have been reacting to the scientific and political revolutions of the late 19th and early 20th century. Martin Heidegger as an established pro-Nazi philosopher and Max Horkheimer as the leading philosopher of the “Frankfurt School” driven into exile are studied as philosophers immersed into the Night of the 20th century.

Finally, post-World War II developments in philosophy (as exemplified by Jürgen Habermas) will be looked at as pathways out of the self-destructive turn the ‘German moment of philosophy’ in Germany had taken in the first decades of the 20th century, and as passages into an emerging world philosophy.

The course will be based upon contemporary attempts at rethinking a global philosophical perspective. The focus is on the tension between the Enlightenment heritage of a universalizing human philosophy and a national culture project, as well as on the tension between classicist rationalism and romantic emotionalism in its construction as a series of philosophical projects. From the perspective of a German version of the dialectics of the Enlightenment, the German philosophers of the 19th and 20thcenturies will be studied in context - combining the reading of key texts with a reconstruction of their historical contexts and their interaction.

Download Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)