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FUBiS Term II 2020

Arrival Day/ Move-In Day: Saturday, May 30, 2020
Departure Day/ Move-Out Day: Saturday, July 11, 2020
Please note that FUBiS Term II and III 2020 had to be canceled due to the outbreak and spread of the novel Coronavirus. Alternatively, we are offering online courses this summer.

Program structure:

  • An A-Track language course can only be combined with a B-Track subject course.
  • An A-Track subject course can only be combined with a B-Track subject course.
  • C- and D-Track courses cannot be combined with other courses.
  • The number of participants in each course is limited to 18 (15 in language courses). In exceptional cases, more participants per class may be allowed.

Course schedule


Printable version of course schedule (pdf)

A-Track Subject Courses

Instructor: Dr. Zishan Ugurlu
Language of instruction:
English
Course type:
Subject course, A-Track
Contact hours:
72 (6 per day)
Course days
: Monday & Thursday
ECTS credits
: 6
Course fee:
€ 1,650
Can be combined with all B-Track courses
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Course Description

This course is an acting course that introduces the student to the research, writing and performance techniques of cabaret performers.

Kabarett is the German word for "cabaret" but has two different meanings. The first meaning is the same as in English; describing a form of entertainment featuring comedy, song, dance, and theater (often the word "Cabaret" is used in German for this as well to distinguish this form). The latter describes a kind of political satire. Unlike comedians who make fun of all kind of things, Kabarett artists (German: Kabarettisten) pride themselves as dedicated almost completely to political and social topics of more serious nature which they criticize using techniques like cynicism, sarcasm and irony.

As Peter Jelavich stated in his book “Berlin Cabaret (Studies in Cultural History)” that every Metropolis tends to generate an urban mythology and Berlin is no exception. One of the more enduring Fables associated with that city is that it was hotbed for Cabaret.

Students will be seeking to assay that tale by examining Cabaret in Europe and specifically in Berlin from 1901-1944 while creating their own solo performance based on research of sources as such diaries, letters, memoirs, and autobiographies that relate Berlin Kabarett. Subjects can be figures such as Gisela May, Trude Hestberg, Anita Berber, Claire Waldoff, Erwin Piscator, Hugo Ball, Blandine Ebinger, Kurt Weill and are of particular interest to the student.

While studying and analyzing the techniques of a wide variety of cabaret performers through its inception, students will explore aspects of writing monologues and implementing those techniques with the ultimate goal of creating and performing their own material -sense of truth- with the courage necessary to stand-alone on stage.

There will be field trips to notable Cabaret/Kabarett shows and venues in the city, which will inspire us visually. In addition to history related readings assignments, the course will incorporate Lisa Appignanesi's "The Cabaret" book for an overall understanding of the forms of artistic cabaret which were to emerge as a meeting place for artists where performance or improvisation takes place among peers, and cabaret as an intimate, small-scale, but intellectually ambitious revue.

The class meets twice a week for three 90-minute segments each day.

The two segments of each class typically involve short lectures on historical and theatrical topics as well as seminar-style discussions of the assigned readings. Some class days devote time to in-depth acting exercises, analyzing the solo performance/cabaret vocabulary and technique. Some class days we will use the afternoon segment for film screenings, excursions to sites in the city or working on your final presentation.

In addition to the regular class meetings and excursions the Course Schedule includes a list of optional recommended cabaret shows, plays, theatrical performances.

Student Profile

This course is open to students from all disciplines and levels, though it may appeal most to students of writing, literature, media, history and acting.

Prerequisites

None

Required Language Skills

The language of instruction is English. Language proficiency on an advanced Intermediate level (Mittelstufe II) is a prerequisite for participation. For orientation purposes, you can assess your language skills here (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR).

Course Requirements

One Book "The Cabaret" by Lisa Appignanesi, and course reader will be provided to each student to cover all the required readings for this course. Please be prepared to discuss the readings in class. Active and enthusiastic participation is required.

Grading

  • 50% Participation on the class exercises, discussions, meeting deadlines, energy and creative growth, attendance
  • 25% Quizzes on reading and listening assignments
  • 25% Presentation of your Solo performance

Literature

The course schedule in the syllabus indicates discussion topics for each class meetings (morning, mid-day, and afternoon sessions) and required readings (marked **) to be completed before that class meeting day.

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)

Instructor: Kim Feser
Language of instruction:
English
Course type:
Subject course, A-Track
Contact hours:
72 (6 per day)
Course days
: Monday & Thursday
ECTS credits
: 6
Course fee:
€ 1,650
Can be combined with all B-Track courses
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Course Description

In many ways, Berlin is a center for contemporary electronic music. This is primarily due to the strong connection between technological and aesthetic developments. Nightclubs, such as the Berghain, have a worldwide reputation for their sound systems, which allow a specific acoustic experience and encourage nightlong dancing and partying. Berlin-based companies such as Ableton and Native Instruments are global leaders in their music software, especially in the context of techno, electronica and electronic dance music. Many DJs and musicians´ market themselves or their tracks via blogs and streaming services. Particularly in the context of sound art, there are fairly strong parallels with media art.

Due to the key 'digital' aspects of such phenomena, we often speak of a 'Digital Age' in which Berlin plays a particular role in the field of music. However, the 'analog' phenomena are constantly growing, so that there is some debate over the beginning of a 'post-digital age'. This corresponds with an increasing focus both on the virtual and haptic dimension. Among other things, software companies have made strong efforts over the past years to develop their own hardware controllers for their computer programs in order to be able to better design musical processes manually.

Based on such phenomena, the course will explore the relationship between aesthetic trends and technological developments with the focus on the cultural and economic conditions in Berlin. Particular emphasis will be made on the past and present of techno, (experimental) electronica and electronic dance music. What makes Berlin a magnet not only for thrill-seeking club-goers, but also for DJs, musicians, producers and developers? How does this relate to the recent past of Berlin since the fall of the Berlin Wall, especially given the gentrification processes? To what extent is Berlin's creative scene at the same time internationally networked and can its conditions only be understood in a global context?

Beyond the Berlin perspective, the course examines the current conditions of production and consumption as well as the performance and distribution of music. How do legal/illegal file sharing and streaming services affect listening to music? What is changing in music culture through sampling, remixing, mashup and approaches to interactive music in video games? What opposing trends are out there?

In addition to the joint discussion of texts and film excerpts, excursions also provide an opportunity for an exchange with proven experts in the course subject areas.    

At the end of the course, the participants can elaborate on and present a topic (either alone or in a group) of their choice in the context of the general list of topics on the course.

Student Profile

This course is intended for students of any disciplines. No prior music and technology background is required. The course aims to provide an insight into the relationship between aesthetic, social and technical developments regarding the topic 'Berlin and the Digital Music Age'. It also examines the conditions of the current production methods of electronic music, but does not teach the specific programming or composing of music.        

Prerequisites

None

Required Language Skills

The language of instruction is English. Language proficiency on an advanced Intermediate level (Mittelstufe II) is a prerequisite for participation. For orientation purposes, you can assess your language skills here (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR).

Course requirements        

  • Active participation
  • Course schedule and excursions
  • Presentation with handouts
  • Course presentation

Grading                                

  • Active participation: 40%
  • Presentation of a text (lecture with handout): 25%
  • Presentation of a chosen topic with a written summary at the end of the course: 35%

Reading

A course reader will be provided.

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)

Instructor: Andreas Voss
Language of instruction:
English
Course type:
Subject course, A-Track
Contact hours:
72 (6 per day)
Course days
: Monday & Thursday
ECTS credits
: 6
Course fee:
€ 1,650
Can be combined with all B-Track courses
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Course Description

In this course, we introduce the students to sustainable and social entrepreneurial thinking and acting by teaching them state-of-the-art tools and methods applied by companies and start-ups worldwide, which students could use to turn their own ideas into actual green and social business ventures. The students receive an overview on topics, such as corporate planning, social start-up finance and pitching. Besides examining how to create the more traditional business plan, we will particularly focus on the following tools: Design Thinking, Systems Thinking, Value Proposition Canvas and Business Model Canvas. Furthermore, we look into creativity techniques, which can help to generate business ideas and the most relevant tools needed to make use of one’s own research results. The students will apply the newly learned tools and methods by analyzing existing case studies and developing their own business ideas.

Moreover, the students will gain a better understanding of the actual meaning of “sustainability” and learn which aspects and topics they need to focus on in order to develop modern and sustainable business models. During the analysis of existing case studies, the students will also learn about the “social business” approach and compare this with non-social business approaches.

The course offers a mix of theoretical input as well as creative and practical group work, which encourages the participants to think and act like a social and green entrepreneur.

In addition, the students receive the opportunity to learn more about the social start-up ecosystem of Berlin during our excursion to the Social Impact Lab (an incubator for social Start-ups), Cayoubo (a green start-up), Berlin Sparkasse (the most important bank in the Start-up sector in Berlin) and Jyoti Fair Works.

Student Profile

The course is designed for students with different academic backgrounds and a general interest in green and sustainable business development.  

Prerequisites

None

Required Language Skills

The language of instruction is English. Language proficiency on an advanced Intermediate level (Mittelstufe II) is a prerequisite for participation. For orientation purposes, you can assess your language skills here (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR).

Course requirements        

  • Attendance and class participation
  • Test
  • Presentation

Grading                                

  • Attendance and class participation: 40%
  • Test: 30%
  • Presentation: 30%

Reading

A course reader will be provided.

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)

A-Track Language Courses

Language of instruction: German
Course type:
Language course, A-Track
Contact hours:
108 (6 per day)
Course days
: Monday, Wednesday & Thursday
ECTS credits
: 6
Course fee:
€ 1,650
Can be combined with all B-Track courses
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Student Profile

This course is designed for the beginner student with no previous knowledge of German.

Course Objectives

Within six weeks, this course will help you to develop basic competences in listening, speaking, reading and writing as well as a basic knowledge of the German culture.

  • By the end of the course you will be able to deal with everyday situations in a German-speaking environment and to conduct simple conversations.
  • You will have developed reading strategies that allow you to understand simple newspaper and magazine articles as well as short literary texts.
  • In addition, you will learn to write, revise and proofread short texts in German.
  • Finally, you will be able to understand discussions on familiar topics.

Textbook

studio [21] Grundstufe A1: Gesamtband. Das Deutschbuch, Hermann Funk, Christina Kuhn, Laura Nielsen, Kerstin Rische, Cornelsen Verlag, 2015.

Literary texts and supplemental materials in consultation with the course instructor.

Daily Lesson and Excursion

Lessons take place Monday, Wednesday and Thursday. On four class days during the term you will go on a course-related excursion.

Attendance

Each class consists of six teaching modules (45 minutes each). If you miss twelve modules (unexcused), your entire course grade will drop by one grade. Coming more than 20 minutes late counts as missing a module (this also applies to excursion days). If you come late to class six times (up to 20 minutes) your entire course grade will also drop by one grade. If you miss 30 modules, you will fail the class.

Active Participation

We expect committed and consistent interest in the acquisition of the German language. You will prove this by participating constructively and productively in the lessons and excursions, completing homework assignments and being prepared for every class. Every student is expected to respect the ideas and comments of his/her peers.

Oral Presentation

You will prepare two three-minute oral presentations. It is important that you speak freely rather than reading the oral presentation and that you keep to the time allowed.

Essay

In this course you will write two essays (font size 12, double-spaced, 100 – 150 words). Your teacher will mark potential errors as such and you are required to correct your essay and hand in a second corrected version. For the first version of your essay you can obtain a maximum of 50 points; for the second version you will receive up to 50% of the missing points.

When writing your essay, you will strive first and foremost for clarity (organization and style) and accuracy (grammar and syntax).

Reflective Journal

Throughout the term you will write various journal entries – independently or on given topics – to reflect on certain aspects of your stay in Berlin. Your instructor will collect these creative exercises and comment the content. However, no corrections will be made. The aim of the journal is that you develop awareness of the language(s) surrounding you

Midterm and Final Exam

You will take a midterm and a final exam consisting of the following sections: listening comprehension, vocabulary, grammar, reading comprehension and composition based on course themes.

Group Project

Together with two or three peers you will prepare a creative and linguistically demanding oral presentation of approximately 10 minutes about your impressions of Berlin (funny, bizarre, interesting facts etc.). The projects (sketches, parodies, PowerPoint presentations, movies, songs, poems etc.) will be presented on the last day of class. Most importantly, every group member should play an active role in the presentation, i.e. should receive an equal amount of speaking time during the presentation.

Evaluation

  • Active participation and homework 300 points
  • Oral presentation (2 à 50 pts) 100 points
  • Essay (2 à 50 pts) 100 points
  • Reflective journal 100 points
  • Midterm exam 150 points
  • Final exam 150 points
  • Group project 100 points

Maximum Score 1,000 points

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)

Language of instruction: German
Course type:
Language course, A-Track
Contact hours:
108 (6 per day)
Course days
: Monday, Wednesday & Thursday
ECTS credits
: 6
Course fee:
€ 1,650
Can be combined with all B-Track courses
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Student Profile

This course is designed for beginners with basic knowledge of German.

Course Objectives

This course will help you to expand your competences in listening, speaking, reading and writing within six weeks, deepen your knowledge of grammar as well as your knowledge of the German culture.

  • By the end of the six-week course you will be able to deal with everyday situations in a German-speaking environment and to conduct simple conversations.
  • You will have developed reading strategies that allow you to understand simple newspaper and magazine articles as well as short literary texts more detailed.
  • In addition, you will improve your essay writing skills, which means you will be able to write short texts on different topics, revise and proofread them.
  • Finally, you will be able to understand discussions on familiar topics more detailed.

Textbook

studio [21] Grundstufe A2: Gesamtband. Das Deutschbuch, Hermann Funk, Christina Kuhn, Cornelsen Verlag, 2015.

Literary texts and supplemental materials in consultation with the course instructor.

Daily Lesson and Excursion

Lessons take place Monday, Wednesday and Thursday. On four class days during the term you will go on a course-related excursion.

Attendance

Each class consists of six teaching modules (45 minutes each). If you miss twelve modules (unexcused), your entire course grade will drop by one grade. Coming more than 20 minutes late counts as missing a module (this also applies to excursion days). If you come late to class six times (up to 20 minutes) your entire course grade will also drop by one grade. If you miss 30 modules, you will fail the class.

Active Participation

We expect committed and consistent interest in the acquisition of the German language. You will prove this by participating constructively and productively in the lessons and excursions, completing homework assignments and being prepared for every class. Every student is expected to respect the ideas and comments of his/her peers.

Oral Presentation

You will prepare two five-minute oral presentations. It is important that you speak freely rather than reading the oral presentation and that you keep to the time allowed.

Essay

In this course you will write two essays (font size 12, double-spaced, 150 – 200 words). Your teacher will mark potential errors as such and you are required to correct your essay and hand in a second corrected version. For the first version of your essay you can obtain a maximum of 50 points; for the second version you will receive up to 50% of the missing points. When writing your essay, you will strive first and foremost for clarity (organization and style) and accuracy (grammar and syntax).

Reflective Journal

Throughout the term you will write various journal entries – independently or on given topics – to reflect on certain aspects of your stay in Berlin. Your instructor will collect these creative exercises and comment the content. However, no corrections will be made. The aim of the journal is that you develop awareness of the language(s) surrounding you

Midterm and Final Exam

You will take a midterm and a final exam consisting of the following sections: listening comprehension, vocabulary, grammar, reading comprehension and composition based on course themes.

Group Project

Together with two or three peers you will prepare a creative and linguistically demanding oral presentation of approximately 10 minutes about your impressions of Berlin (funny, bizarre, interesting facts etc.). The projects (sketches, parodies, PowerPoint presentations, movies, songs, poems etc.) will be presented on the last day of class. Most importantly, every group member should play an active role in the presentation, i.e. should receive an equal amount of speaking time during the presentation.

Evaluation

  • Active participation and homework 300 points
  • Oral presentation (2 à 50 pts) 100 points
  • Essay (2 à 50 pts) 100 points
  • Reflective journal 100 points
  • Midterm exam 150 points
  • Final exam 150 points
  • Group project 100 points

Maximum score 1,000 points

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)

Language of instruction: German
Course type:
Language course, A-Track
Contact hours:
108 (6 per day)
Course days
: Monday, Wednesday & Thursday
ECTS credits
: 6
Course fee:
€ 1,650
Can be combined with all B-Track courses
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Student Profile

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed the basic level of German and who have a sound knowledge of German at the A2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

Course Objectives

Within six weeks, this course will help you to expand your competences in listening, speaking, reading and writing as well as strengthen your knowledge of grammar, while emphasizing self-correction.

Furthermore, you will analyze and interpret cultural, political, and historical topics in German-speaking countries and compare them with your own cultural background.

  • By the end of the six-week course you will have developed and regularly use new strategies for language acquisition.
  • You will be able to engage in detailed discussions on above mentioned topics.
  • Furthermore, you will have developed reading strategies that will allow you to understand different text types in detail.
  • In addition, you will improve your essay writing skills, i.e. you will be able to write short texts on different topics, revise and proofread them.

Textbook

studio [21] Grundstufe B1: Gesamtband. Das Deutschbuch, Hermann Funk, Christina Kuhn, Britta Winzer-Kiontke, Cornelsen Verlag, 2015.

Literary texts and supplemental materials in consultation with the course instructor.

Daily Lesson and Excursion

Lessons take place Monday, Wednesday and Thursday. On four class days during the term you will go on a course-related excursion.

Attendance

Each class consists of six teaching modules (45 minutes each). If you miss twelve modules (unexcused), your entire course grade will drop by one grade. Coming more than 20 minutes late counts as missing a module (this also applies to excursion days). If you come late to class six times (up to 20 minutes) your entire course grade will also drop by one grade. If you miss 30 modules, you will fail the class.

Active Participation

We expect committed and consistent interest in the acquisition of the German language. You will prove this by participating constructively and productively in the lessons and excursions, completing homework assignments and being prepared for every class. Every student is expected to respect the ideas and comments of his/her peers.

Oral Presentation

You will prepare a five-minute and a ten-minute oral presentation. In one of them you will introduce and explain a certain topic related to Berlin. It is important that you prepare and explain for your presentation relevant vocabulary beforehand (max. 5 – 7) and that you give your peers a specific assignment. Furthermore, it is important that you speak freely rather than reading the oral presentation and that you keep to the time allowed.

Essay

In this course you will write two essays (font size 12, double-spaced, 200 – 250 words). Your teacher will mark potential errors as such and you are required to correct your essay and hand in a second corrected version. For the first version of your essay you can obtain a maximum of 50 points; for the second version you will receive up to 50% of the missing points.

When writing your essay, you will strive first and foremost for clarity (organization and style) and accuracy (grammar and syntax). You are encouraged to incorporate complex constructions, but please concentrate on syntactic and grammatical accuracy.

Reflective Journal

Throughout the term you will write various journal entries – independently or on given topics – to reflect on certain aspects of your stay in Berlin. Your instructor will collect these creative exercises and comment the content. However, no corrections will be made. The aim of the journal is that you learn how to express a critical and self-reflective position in a linguistically creative way

Midterm and Final Exam

You will take a midterm and a final exam consisting of the following sections: listening comprehension, vocabulary, grammar, reading comprehension and composition based on course themes.

Group Project

Together with two or three peers you will prepare a creative and linguistically demanding oral presentation of approximately 10 minutes about your impressions of Berlin (funny, bizarre, interesting facts etc.). The projects (sketches, parodies, PowerPoint presentations, movies, songs, poems etc.) will be presented on the last day of class. Most importantly, every group member should play an active role in the presentation, i.e. should receive an equal amount of speaking time during the presentation.

Evaluation

  • Active participation and homework 300 points
  • Oral presentation (2 à 50 pts) 100 points
  • Essay (2 à 50 pts) 100 points
  • Reflective journal 100 points
  • Midterm exam 150 points
  • Final exam 150 points
  • Group project 100 points

Maximum score 1,000 points

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)   

Language of instruction: German
Course type:
Language course, A-Track
Contact hours:
108 (6 per day)
Course days
: Monday, Wednesday & Thursday
ECTS credits
: 6
Course fee:
€ 1,650
Can be combined with all B-Track courses
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Student Profile

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed the basic level and the first part of the intermediate level of German and who have a sound knowledge of German at the B1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

Course Objectives

Within six weeks, this course will help you to expand your competences in speaking and writing while emphasizing self-correction. Furthermore, it will help you to increase your vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and develop effective reading and listening strategies.

In addition, you will analyze and interpret cultural, political, and historical topics in German-speaking countries and compare them with your own cultural background.

  • By the end of the six-week course you will have developed and regularly use new strategies for language acquisition.
  • You will be able to engage in detailed discussions on above mentioned topics.
  • Furthermore, you will have developed reading strategies that will allow you to understand different text types in detail.
  • In addition, you will improve your essay writing skills, i.e. you will be able to write short texts on different topics, revise and proofread them.

Textbook

Sicher! B2-Kursbuch, Dr. Michaela Perlmann-Balme, Susanne Schwalb, Hueber Verlag 2014. Literary texts and supplemental materials in consultation with the course instructor.

Daily Lesson and Excursion

Lessons take place Monday, Wednesday and Thursday. On four class days during the term you will go on a course-related excursion.

Attendance

Each class consists of six teaching modules (45 minutes each). If you miss twelve modules (unexcused), your entire course grade will drop by one grade. Coming more than 20 minutes late counts as missing a module (this also applies to excursion days). If you come late to class six times (up to 20 minutes) your entire course grade will also drop by one grade. If you miss 30 modules, you will fail the class.

Active Participation

We expect committed and consistent interest in the acquisition of the German language. You will prove this by participating constructively and productively in the lessons and excursions, completing homework assignments and being prepared for every class. Every student is expected to respect the ideas and comments of his/her peers.

Oral Presentation

You will prepare a five-minute and a ten-minute oral presentation. In one of them you will introduce and explain a certain topic related to Berlin. It is important that you prepare and explain for your presentation relevant vocabulary beforehand (max. 10) and that you give your peers a specific assignment. Furthermore, it is important that you speak freely rather than reading the oral presentation and that you keep to the time allowed.

Essay

In this course you will write two essays (font size 12, double-spaced, 250 – 300 words). Your teacher will mark potential errors as such and you are required to correct your essay and hand in a second corrected version. For the first version of your essay you can obtain a maximum of 50 points; for the second version you will receive up to 50% of the missing points. When writing your essay, you will strive first and foremost for clarity (organization and style) and accuracy (grammar and syntax). You are encouraged to incorporate complex constructions, but please concentrate on syntactic and grammatical accuracy.

Reflective Journal

Throughout the term you will write various journal entries – independently or on given topics – to reflect on certain aspects of your stay in Berlin. Your instructor will collect these creative exercises and comment the content. However, no corrections will be made. The aim of the journal is that you learn how to express a critical and self-reflective position in a linguistically creative way

Midterm and Final Exam

You will take a midterm and a final exam consisting of the following sections: listening comprehension, vocabulary, grammar, reading comprehension and composition based on course themes.

Group Project

Together with two or three peers you will prepare a creative and linguistically demanding oral presentation of approximately 10 minutes about your impressions of Berlin (funny, bizarre, interesting facts etc.). The projects (sketches, parodies, PowerPoint presentations, movies, songs, poems etc.) will be presented on the last day of class. Most importantly, every group member should play an active role in the presentation, i.e. should receive an equal amount of speaking time during the presentation.

Evaluation

  • Active participation and homework 300 points
  • Oral presentation (2 à 50 pts) 100 points
  • Essay (2 à 50 pts) 100 points
  • Reflective journal 100 points
  • Midterm exam 150 points
  • Final exam 150 points
  • Group project 100 points

Maximum score 1,000 points

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)   

Language of instruction: German
Course type:
Language course, A-Track
Contact hours:
108 (6 per day)
Course days
: Monday, Wednesday & Thursday
ECTS credits
: 6
Course fee:
€ 1,650
Can be combined with all B-Track courses
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Student Profile

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed the intermediate level of German and who have a sound knowledge of German at the B2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

Course Objectives

The course aims to deepen your competence in speaking and writing and to expand and refine your vocabulary usage, so that you are able to express and discuss ideas, opinions and information at the academic level. Special attention is given to the consistent use of self-correction. Furthermore, the course helps you to develop effective reading and listening strategies and deepen your knowledge of grammar structures.

In addition, you will analyze and interpret cultural, political, and historical topics in German-speaking countries and compare them with your own cultural background.

  • By the end of the six-week course you will have developed and regularly use new strategies for language acquisition.
  • You will have improved your ability to choose the right linguistic register for different situations, topics and communication partners.
  • You will be able to lead and participate in academic discussions about certain course-related topics.
  • In addition, you will expand and refine your essay writing skills, i.e. you will be able to write, revise and proofread essays that meet the standards of academic writing.

Textbook

studio: Die Mittelstufe. Deutsch als Fremdsprache C1, Christina Kuhn, Britta Winzer-Kiontke, Cornelsen Verlag, 2015.

Literary texts and supplemental materials in consultation with the course instructor.

Daily Lesson and Excursion

Lessons take place Monday, Wednesday and Thursday. On four class days during the term you will go on a course-related excursion.

Attendance

Each class consists of six teaching modules (45 minutes each). If you miss twelve modules (unexcused), your entire course grade will drop by one grade. Coming more than 20 minutes late counts as missing a module (this also applies to excursion days). If you come late to class six times (up to 20 minutes) your entire course grade will also drop by one grade. If you miss 30 modules, you will fail the class.

Active Participation

We expect committed and consistent interest in the acquisition of the German language. You will prove this by participating constructively and productively in the lessons and excursions, completing homework assignments and being prepared for every class. Every student is expected to respect the ideas and comments of his/her peers.

Oral Presentation

You will prepare a five-minute and a ten-minute oral presentation. You are also required to prepare a handout for your peers listing unfamiliar vocabulary (max. 20) and posing questions. Furthermore, it is important that you speak freely rather than reading the oral presentations and that you keep to the time allowed.

Essay

In preparation for your final paper, you will compose an essay in 12-font and double spaced (300-350 words). Your teacher will mark potential errors as such and you are required to correct your essay and hand in a second corrected version. For the first version of your essay you can obtain a maximum of 100 points; for the second version you will receive up to 50% of the missing points.

When writing your essay you will strive first and foremost for clarity (organization and style) and accuracy (grammar and syntax). You are encouraged to incorporate complex constructions, but please concentrate on syntactic and grammatical accuracy.

In addition, you will write a journal entry reflection on your essay and the writing process. This reflection together with your instructor’s suggestions and comments will help you to expand your essay into a research paper for the final project.

Reflective Journal

Throughout the term you will write various journal entries – independently or on given topics – to reflect on certain aspects of your stay in Berlin, e.g. question personal impressions, compare historical or contemporary phenomena, reflect on certain topics discussed in class, etc. Your instructor will collect these creative exercises and comment the content. However, no corrections will be made. The aim of the journal is that you learn how to express a critical and self-reflective position in a linguistically creative way.

Midterm

You will take a midterm exam consisting of the following sections: listening comprehension, vocabulary, grammar, reading comprehension and composition based on course themes.

Final Project

The final project will be a four-page written research paper (font size 12, double-spaced) and a five-minute in-class presentation. The final paper has to meet the standards of academic writing. In terms of content this means that a certain topic has to be investigated systematically and the results have to be presented in a structured and logical way. In terms of form it means that you keep to one single citation style and that you include all the sources you used for your research paper in a reference-list.

You will complete your final paper by executing the following steps:

  • Based on your essay you will write an outline, which will be commented by your instructor.
  • Then you will write your final paper, which will be due by the beginning of the final week of the course.
  • In class you will proofread your final paper together with your peers and check for errors in terms of content and form.
  • You will have the opportunity to revise your final paper before handing it in.

At the last day of class you will present your results in a five-minute presentation. It is important that you speak freely rather than reading your presentation and that you keep to the time allowed.

Evaluation

  • Active participation and homework 300 points
  • Oral presentation (2 à 50 pts) 100 points
  • Essay 100 points
  • Reflective journal 100 points
  • Midterm exam 150 points
  • Final project 250 points (200 final paper + 50 presentation)

Maximum score 1,000 points

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)

B-Track Subject Courses

Instructor: Dr. Stefano de Bosio
Language of instruction:
English
Course type:
Subject course, B-Track
Course days
: Tuesday & Friday
ECTS credits
: 6
Course fee:
€ 1,650
Can be combined with all A-Track courses
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Course Description

This course explores European art from the 15th to the 20th century with a particular focus on urban centers like Florence, Rome, Venice, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Paris, London, and Berlin. The aim is to analyze how the visual arts contributed through the centuries to shape local identities as well as European cultural traditions common to different countries and transcultural, global networks.

The course will present iconic moments of the history of the arts in Europe by drawing a special attention to episodes of cultural exchanges and hybridization that arose from travelling artworks as well as from artists’ travels in Europe and beyond. From the role of artists like Raphael and Michelangelo in 16th-century papal Rome to the rise of genre painting in the Flanders and the Dutch Republic of the Golden Age, from the ‘painters of modern life’ in 19th-century Paris to the German Avant-garde of the 1920s, we will analyze the artworks and their authors in relation to the different historical contexts and the places of their creation. Recurrent will be the focus on the complex interplay between artists and patrons, between local traditions, individual creativity and the broader social, political and cultural contexts in which artworks and buildings were produced.

Students will gain understanding of the main art movements and relevant artists from the Renaissance to the postwar period as well as the basic concepts and terminology of art history. Visits to the outstanding collections of Berlin museums will allow the participants to study original artifacts and to learn how to look closely at works of art.

Student Profile

The course addresses students of any subject.

Prerequisites

An elementary knowledge of European history is welcome but not necessary.

Required Language Skills

The language of instruction is English. Language proficiency on an advanced Intermediate level (Mittelstufe II) is a prerequisite for participation. For orientation purposes, you can assess your language skills here (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR).

Course Requirements

Regular attendance and active participation, mid-term oral presentation and final written exam.

Grading

  • 30% Attendance & participation
  • 30% Mid-term presentation (oral presentation of a work in Berlin museums)
  • 40% Final Exam

Reading

A course reader will be provided at the orientation meeting.

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)

Instructor: Dr. Robert G. Waite
Language of instruction:
English
Course type:
Subject course, B-Track
Course days
: Tuesday & Friday
ECTS credits
: 6
Course fee:
€ 1,650
Can be combined with all A-Track courses
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Course Description

The ‘thousand year Reich’ that Hitler promised when he became Chancellor of Germany in January 1933 lasted but 12 years. During this time, Hitler and his Nazi Party came to dominate Europe, terrorizing vast numbers of Germans, launching a devastating war, and orchestrating the murder of more than five million Jews. In spite of the terror and vast destruction, Hitler and the Nazi Party gained the active support and involvement of most Germans. How was this possible? What roles did seduction and terror play?

This class focuses on Hitler’s Germany and it begins with the 19th century background. Central to this session will be a discussion of the broad political currents, the agitators and petty demagogues who fueled the dissatisfaction and spread it widely. We will also examine the popular literature that Hitler and many of his supporters read and absorbed.

Crucial to understanding the lure of Hitler and the Nazi Party was Germany’s experience in the First World War, a conflict that decimated a generation and destroyed Europe, as it was known. It left in its wake a shattered, humiliated, and deeply torn Germany. In this climate of uncertainty and despair, Hitler and the Nazi Party grew from a small group on the fringe of radical politics in Munich to a national force. This development is of central importance to this session. Those traits of Hitler crucial to his success, particularly his charisma, will be defined and analyzed within the broader political context of Weimar political and cultural life.

In late January 1933, Hitler gained the long desired but elusive goal: he became chancellor of Germany, the leader of a coalition government. The political intrigues leading to his appointment will be discussed. Much attention will be paid in this session to how Hitler, his cabinet, and supporters were able to consolidate the control over the state and society within a matter of months. This came at the cost of political liberties, through the growing use of terror, oppression, and intimidation. Yet, Hitler gained supporters as he seemingly offered economic stability and a new unity to the German people. How did the regime solidify its control over society and political life?

A key element of Hitler’s rule was the concentration camp system, what came to be a vast network of prisons, centers of oppression and death. How this developed from the dozens of small concentration camps set up across Germany immediately following Hitler’s takeover of power in 1933 to the well-organized and highly centralized system in 1939 will be the focus of this session. During the war, the concentration camp system spread across Germany and occupied Europe.

Hitler’s ambitions, the conquest of ‘living space’ in Eastern Europe, the ruthless exploitation of these territories, and the annihilation of the Jews, motivated his foreign ambitions and led directly to World War II, the most destructive conflict in human history. We will also discuss the measures taken against the handicapped, homosexuals, Sinti and Roma.

In Germany and in occupied Europe opposition and resistance emerged and challenged Nazi rule. Opponents were motivated by a variety of reasons, some personal, some political. These too will be discussed.

Lastly, the class will examine the end of the war, the so-called ‘zero hour’, the destruction and collapse of Germany.

We will also be visiting local museums, historical sites and locations that reveal the operations of Nazi rule. These visits to sites in and near Berlin are a key element of the class and the experience of studying here.

Student Profile        

We welcome students from all disciplines who are interested in gaining an insight into the operations and dynamics of Nazi rule in Germany and its attempt to annihilate the Jews and to dominate the continent.

Prerequisites           

Interest and curiosity.

Required Language Skills

The language of instruction is English. Language proficiency on an advanced Intermediate level (Mittelstufe II) is a prerequisite for participation. For orientation purposes, you can assess your language skills here (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR).

Course Requirements        

Attendance in class, the careful reading of the assigned course materials, participation in the field trips, the discussion of the material in class, the completion of two short research papers (3-5 pages), and the final examination. Guidelines for the papers as well as suggested topics will be provided during the first session.

Grading        

  • 20% Class participation
  • 40% Two short papers
  • 40% Final exam

Reading        

A course reader will be provided at the first meeting of the class. This includes a recent monograph on Nazi Germany, a selection of articles offering the newest research and insights, excerpts from original documents (in translation), a weekly schedule of the readings and a series of questions as a guide through each of the texts.

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection):

Instructor: Dr. Lauren van Vuuren
Language of instruction:
English
Course type:
Subject course, B-Track
Course days
: Tuesday & Friday
ECTS credits
: 6
Course fee:
€ 1,650
Can be combined with all A-Track courses
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Course Description

This course is about Berlin, and the story of its tumultuous and epoch defining twentieth century. We examine this history through various lenses: the biographies of individuals, the words of writers who bore witness to the vertiginous social, political and physical changes the city underwent, and buildings and monuments whose physical construction, destruction and reconstruction reflected the ideological turmoil and conflict of twentieth century Berlin.

Famous Berliners we will meet include the murdered Communist leader Rosa Luxemburg, the artist Käthe Kollwitz, the actress Marlene Dietrich, the Nazi filmmaker Leni Riefenstahl, the adopted Berliner David Bowie and the famous East German dissident musician Wolf Biermann. The contextualized stories of these individuals will offer us unique perspectives politically, artistically and socially into the tumult and struggle that marked their times in the city. These figures occupy a range of different position(s) as Berliners, as radicals, as artists of resistance to or collaboration with Nazism, and Communism, as drifters and exiles whose stories reflect Berlin’s unique position in the twentieth century as ‘no man’s land, frontier, a city adrift in the sands of Central Europe.’

In a similar way, we will examine the words of writers who bore witness to the extremism and societal upheaval that marked twentieth century Berlin. From the witnessing of Roth and Isherwood to life in Weimar and Nazi Berlin, to the social and political commentary by Christa Wolf on the moral struggles of life lived on different sides of the Berlin Wall, we will assess their writings in their historical contexts. We will assess their words as evocations of Berlin, but also as potential or overt acts of resistance to the extremism they lived under, that attempted to maintain a solidarity with the idea of Berlin as a place of artistic and social freedom and permissiveness.

Finally, we will discover the story of places in Berlin whose physical building, destruction and rebuilding can be situated in the wider systems of ideology, power and social relations that so cataclysmically defined the physical landscape of Berlin after 1933. In this, we will focus on the story of Potsdamer Platz, the Palace of the People and as an opposite postscript to Berlin’s twentieth century, the Holocaust Memorial in Mitte.

This course does not seek to provide a ‘grand narrative’ of Berlin’s twentieth century history. Instead, it follows a thread that weaves through the history: the thread left behind by those who bore witness to their times. By tracing the stories of contemporary witnesses, left for us in books, films and songs, and in the physical construction of the city, we open up a human dimension that enriches and challenges our understanding of Berlin’s traumatic recent history.

Structured largely chronologically, the course will work with films and novels whilst building on a clear historiographical base provided in class seminars. The teaching will be augmented by physical excursions into Berlin to trace the stories we encounter and class discussions will form the basis for a seminar paper that students will be required to submit at the end of the course. This history course approaches the story of Berlin through the reflections and refractions of individual humans’ lives who struggled upon the immense stage of a city at the very symbolic and literal heart of the catastrophes of the twentieth century.

Student Profile

This course is for university level students with open minds and incurable curiosity about the world around them.

Prerequisites

Interest in Berlin, and its extraordinary recent past.

Required Language Skills

The language of instruction is English. Language proficiency on an advanced Intermediate level (Mittelstufe II) is a prerequisite for participation. For orientation purposes, you can assess your language skills here (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR).

Course Requirements

Attendance in class and the careful reading of the assigned course materials are most important. The reading pack will be divided into compulsory and supplementary readings. Furthermore, the course will require participation in the field trips, engaged discussion of the material in class that shows you have completed the required reading, and the completion of a final paper on a topic related to the course but decided by yourself in discussion with the lecturer. Guidelines for the papers as well as suggested topics will be distributed during the first session. The instructor will be available for student consultations should any further guidance be required.

Grading

  • Class participation: 20%
  • Short presentation: 20%
  • Research paper: 60%

‘Class Participation’ will include participation in field trips and engagement in discussion in class. ‘Short Presentation’ will be a brief presentation whereby students will describe the topic they have chosen for their research paper, and link their choice to themes in the course that they have found interesting. It will provide a useful chance for feedback and discussion within the group as a whole.

Reading

Readings for the course are contained in a reader that will be provided at orientation.

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)

Instructor: Dr. Anika Keinz
Language of instruction:
English
Course type:
Subject course, B-Track
Contact hours:
72 (6 per day)
Course days
: Tuesday & Friday
ECTS credits
: 6
Course fee:
€ 1,650
Can be combined with all A-Track courses
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Course Description

Regarding transnational migration, the European Union as a supranational community promotes a political reasoning between processes of consolidation and necessary conflict, between sovereignty and shared responsibility, between the right to define and delimit and the duty to negotiate. In ongoing economic crisis and facing unprecedented movements of people, the timeless normalcy of migration is often framed as crisis per se. Populist claims for cultural homogeneity and for closed borders undercut efforts for a common migration policy.

As the visibility of migration increases in various ways, migrants are often represented and imagined as a homogenous mass of ‘the other’. This leads to a problematic understanding of migration as something similar to a natural disaster that requires to be controlled and governed from a strategic top-down perspective. But the respective processes of negotiation on migration policy, within and across the outer borders of the Union, take place not only between the official institutions of nation-states, but on all scales of European populations. They also take place from a bottom-up perspective in the centres and at the margins of societies alike, where the single person contributes to the respective discourses as well: It is here, where either homogenizing images of threat are reproduced or sensible policies of individuality are practised.

Departing from diverse theories of migration (mainstream as well as critical perspectives), we will gain an overview of EU-level migration polity and recent migration- and border-management policies. We will analyse the conflicts, debates and discourses around the last years of increased immigration in Germany. Step by step we will get aware of the notion of identity politics, which can manifest in peaceful diversity, but is time and again prone to provoke social dynamics of disintegration. After analyzing the simplifying languages of exclusion in populist discourse, we will focus on the “legalization-market” of Almería/Spain, to learn about the imbrications of migration and economic calculations on one of the biggest “illegal labor markets” in the EU.

Scaling down perspective on the local level in the fieldtrips, we will engage with local authorities’ and politicians’ perspectives in Berlin. Diving deeper down we will start to change perspective: How do local activists develop and implement their own policies of welcoming migrants? What are the aims of and how do legal assessment organizations for migrants work? We will see, how refugees themselves perceive EU-migration policies and what they make themselves of their public positioning as a ‘problem’ or as a ‘burden’ to European Societies.

We will encounter migrants’ viewpoints, which reach beyond the usual framings of ‘the poor migrant’ as ‘passive victim’, as a threat or as the ‘(anti-)hero’ of globalization. We will encounter viewpoints on the EU, which will constructively criticize as well as graciously affirm the spirit of the Union. We will encounter viewpoints of hope.

Student Profile

This course is designed for all students having a personal, professional or political personal interest in a deeper and thus more differentiated understanding of transnational migration.

Prerequisites

No prior knowledge is required – but the willingness to think beyond the usual framings on migration and identity.

Required Language Skills

The language of instruction is English. Language proficiency on an advanced Intermediate level (Mittelstufe II) is a prerequisite for participation. For orientation purposes, you can assess your language skills here (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR).

Course Requirements

  • The basic conditions for the course are regular attendance, participation in discussions and a close reading of the literature provided.
  • In one page of continuous text, every course-day’s core discussions and conclusions are to be summarized and questions regarding the texts formulated, in preparation for the next sessions.
  • Each student (together with fellow students) is required one time to prepare an input-presentation of a text in class (max. 10 min. each person).
  • The final examination (90 min.) will consist of answering 2-3 leading questions regarding the contents of the seminar in continuous text.

Grading

  • 40% Participation & Day's summaries and questions
  • 30% Text Presentation
  • 30% Final Examination  

Reading

A course reader will be provided at the first course meeting

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)

Instructor: Prof. Dr. Volker Nitsch
Language of instruction:
English
Course type:
Subject course, B-Track
Contact hours:
72 (6 per day)
Course days
: Tuesday & Friday
ECTS credits
: 6
Course fee:
€ 1,650
Can be combined with all A-Track courses
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Course Description

What is today’s role of the European Union? After decades towards greater integration, economic relationships have recently become more fragile. Examples of the rise of disintegration include tendencies of secession and the exit of countries from international institutional arrangements. In view of strong interdependencies between economic actors (global supply chains), these disruptions seem to be particularly costly and may require appropriate policy responses.

This course introduces the main economic aspects of the current development of the European Union (EU) and its policies. The basic idea is to discuss general issues in economic integration with a strong emphasis on experiences in Europe. After reviewing the institutional, political and historical background of European integration, the main focus is on the economic analysis of the policies and prospects for the European Union and its economic impacts on individuals, firms and regions.

Some recent developments in the international policy agenda like sovereign debt crises, Brexit and the euro crisis will also be covered.

This course provides an introduction to economic tools and concepts useful for the analysis of European integration. More generally, students learn to apply economic theory to real-world problems.

Student Profile

The course is open to students from all disciplines.

Prerequisites

Elementary knowledge of economics and statistics is desirable.

Required Language Skills

The language of instruction is English. Language proficiency on an advanced Intermediate level (Mittelstufe II) is a prerequisite for participation. For orientation purposes, you can assess your language skills here (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR).

Course Requirements

Regular attendance and active participation, short research paper and final written exam.

Grading

  • 20% Class participation
  • 30% Short Paper (3-5 pages)
  • 50% Final exam

Reading

A reader will be provided at the orientation meeting.

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)

C-Track Language Courses

Language of instruction: German
Course type:
Language course, C-Track
Contact hours:
180 (6 per day)
Course days
: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday
ECTS credits
: 9
Course fee:
€ 2,475
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Student Profile

This course is designed for the beginner student with no previous knowledge of German. This course is intensive and is intended for dedicated, highly self-motivated students who will take responsibility for their learning.

Course Objectives

Within six weeks, this course will help you to develop basic competences in listening, speaking, reading and writing as well as a basic knowledge of the German culture.

  • By the end of the course you will be able to deal with everyday situations in a German-speaking environment and to conduct simple conversations.
  • You will have developed reading strategies that allow you to understand simple newspaper and magazine articles as well as short literary texts.
  • In addition, you will learn to write, revise and proofread short texts in German.
  • Finally, you will be able to understand discussions on familiar topics.

Textbook

studio [21] Grundstufe A1: Gesamtband. Das Deutschbuch, Hermann Funk, Christina Kuhn, Laura Nielsen, Kerstin Rische, Cornelsen Verlag, 2015.

Literary texts and supplemental materials in consultation with the course instructor.

Daily Lesson and Excursion

Monday through Friday are lessons. On four class days during the term you will go on a course-related excursion.

Attendance

Each class consists of six teaching modules (45 minutes each). If you miss 20 modules (unexcused), your entire course grade will drop by one grade. Coming more than 20 minutes late counts as missing a module (this also applies to excursion days). If you come late to class six times (up to 20 minutes) your entire course grade will also drop by one grade. If you miss 50 modules, you will fail the class.

Active Participation

We expect committed and consistent interest in the acquisition of the German language. You will prove this by participating constructively and productively in the lessons and excursions, completing homework assignments and being prepared for every class. Every student is expected to respect the ideas and comments of his/her peers.

Oral Presentation

You will prepare a three-minute and a five-minute oral presentation. It is important that you speak freely rather than reading the oral presentation and that you keep to the time allowed.

Essay

In this course you will write two essays (font size 12, double-spaced, 100 – 150 words). Your teacher will mark potential errors as such and you are required to correct your essay and hand in a second corrected version. For the first version of your essay you can obtain a maximum of 50 points; for the second version you will receive up to 50% of the missing points.

When writing your essay, you will strive first and foremost for clarity (organization and style) and accuracy (grammar and syntax).

Reflective Journal

Throughout the term you will write various journal entries – independently or on given topics – to reflect on certain aspects of your stay in Berlin. Your instructor will collect these creative exercises and comment the content. However, no corrections will be made. The aim of the journal is that you develop awareness of the language(s) surrounding you.

Midterm and Final Exam

You will take a midterm and a final exam consisting of the following sections: listening comprehension, vocabulary, grammar, reading comprehension and composition based on course themes.

Group Project

Together with two or three peers you will prepare a creative and linguistically demanding oral presentation of approximately 10 minutes about your impressions of Berlin (funny, bizarre, interesting facts etc.). The projects (sketches, parodies, PowerPoint presentations, movies, songs, poems etc.) will be presented on the last day of class. Most importantly, every group member should play an active role in the presentation, i.e. should receive an equal amount of speaking time during the presentation.

Evaluation

  • Active participation and homework 250 points
  • Oral presentation (2 à 50 pts) 100 points
  • Essay (2 à 75 pts) 150 points
  • Reflective Journal 100 points
  • Midterm exam 150 points
  • Final exam 150 points
  • Group project 100 points

Maximum Score 1,000 points

Language of instruction: German
Course type:
Language course, C-Track
Contact hours:
180 (6 per day)
Course days
: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday
ECTS credits
: 9
Course fee:
€ 2,475
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Student Profile

This course is designed for beginners with basic knowledge of German. This course is intensive and is intended for dedicated, highly self-motivated students who will take responsibility for their learning.

Course Objectives

This course will help you to expand your competences in listening, speaking, reading and writing within six weeks, deepen your knowledge of grammar as well as your knowledge of the German culture.

  • By the end of the six-week course you will be able to deal with everyday situations in a German-speaking environment and to conduct simple conversations.
  • You will have developed reading strategies that allow you to understand simple newspaper and magazine articles as well as short literary texts more detailed.
  • In addition, you will improve your essay writing skills, which means you will be able to write short texts on different topics, revise and proofread them.
  • Finally, you will be able to understand discussions on familiar topics more detailed.

Textbook

studio [21] Grundstufe A2: Gesamtband. Das Deutschbuch, Hermann Funk, Christina Kuhn, Cornelsen Verlag, 2015.

Literary texts and supplemental materials in consultation with the course instructor.

Daily Lesson and Excursion

Monday through Friday are lessons. On four class days during the term you will go on a course-related excursion.

Attendance

Each class consists of six teaching modules (45 minutes each). If you miss 20 modules (unexcused), your entire course grade will drop by one grade. Coming more than 20 minutes late counts as missing a module (this also applies to excursion days). If you come late to class six times (up to 20 minutes) your entire course grade will also drop by one grade. If you miss 50 modules, you will fail the class.

Active Participation

We expect committed and consistent interest in the acquisition of the German language. You will prove this by participating constructively and productively in the lessons and excursions, completing homework assignments and being prepared for every class. Every student is expected to respect the ideas and comments of his/her peers.

Oral Presentation

You will prepare a five-minute and a five to seven-minute oral presentation. It is important that you speak freely rather than reading the oral presentation and that you keep to the time allowed.

Essay

In this course you will write two essays (font size 12, double-spaced, 150 – 200 words). Your teacher will mark potential errors as such and you are required to correct your essay and hand in a second corrected version. For the first version of your essay you can obtain a maximum of 50 points; for the second version you will receive up to 50% of the missing points. When writing your essay, you will strive first and foremost for clarity (organization and style) and accuracy (grammar and syntax).

Reflective Journal

Throughout the term you will write various journal entries – independently or on given topics – to reflect on certain aspects of your stay in Berlin. Your instructor will collect these creative exercises and comment the content. However, no corrections will be made. The aim of the journal is that you develop awareness of the language(s) surrounding you.

Midterm and Final Exam

You will take a midterm and a final exam consisting of the following sections: listening comprehension, vocabulary, grammar, reading comprehension and composition based on course themes.

Group Project

Together with two or three peers you will prepare a creative and linguistically demanding oral presentation of approximately 10 minutes about your impressions of Berlin (funny, bizarre, interesting facts etc.). The projects (sketches, parodies, PowerPoint presentations, movies, songs, poems etc.) will be presented on the last day of class. Most importantly, every group member should play an active role in the presentation, i.e. should receive an equal amount of speaking time during the presentation.

Evaluation

  • Active participation and homework 250 points
  • Oral presentation (2 à 50 pts) 100 points
  • Essay (2 à 75 pts) 150 points
  • Reflective journal 100 points
  • Midterm exam 150 points
  • Final exam 150 points
  • Group project 100 points

Maximum score 1,000 points

Language of instruction: German
Course type:
Language course, C-Track
Contact hours:
180 (6 per day)
Course days
: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday
ECTS credits
: 9
Course fee:
€ 2,475
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Student Profile

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed the basic level of German and who have a sound knowledge of German at the A2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. This course is intensive and is intended for dedicated, highly self-motivated students who will take responsibility for their learning.

Course Objectives

Within six weeks, this course will help you to expand your competences in listening, speaking, reading and writing as well as strengthen your knowledge of grammar, while emphasizing self-correction. You will also expand your knowledge of the German culture and analyze and interpret cultural, political, and historical topics in German-speaking countries and compare them with your own cultural background.

  • By the end of the six-week course you will have developed and regularly use new strategies for language acquisition.
  • You will be able to engage in detailed discussions on above mentioned topics.
  • Furthermore, you will have developed reading strategies that will allow you to understand different text types in detail.
  • In addition, you will improve your essay writing skills, i.e. you will be able to write short texts on different topics, revise and proofread them.

Textbook

studio [21] Grundstufe B1: Gesamtband. Das Deutschbuch, Hermann Funk, Christina Kuhn, Britta Winzer-Kiontke, Cornelsen Verlag, 2015.

Literary texts and supplemental materials in consultation with the course instructor.

Daily Lesson and Excursion

Monday through Friday are lessons. On four class days during the term you will go on a course-related excursion.

Attendance

Each class consists of six teaching modules (45 minutes each). If you miss 20 modules (unexcused), your entire course grade will drop by one grade. Coming more than 20 minutes late counts as missing a module (this also applies to excursion days). If you come late to class six times (up to 20 minutes) your entire course grade will also drop by one grade. If you miss 50 modules, you will fail the class.

Active Participation

We expect committed and consistent interest in the acquisition of the German language. You will prove this by participating constructively and productively in the lessons and excursions, completing homework assignments and being prepared for every class. Every student is expected to respect the ideas and comments of his/her peers.

Oral Presentation

You will prepare a five-minute and a ten-minute oral presentation. In one of them you will introduce and explain a certain topic related to Berlin. It is important that you prepare and explain for your presentation relevant vocabulary beforehand (max. 5 – 7) and that you give your peers a specific assignment. Furthermore, it is important that you speak freely rather than reading the oral presentation and that you keep to the time allowed.

Essay

In this course you will write two essays (font size 12, double-spaced, 200 – 250 words). Your teacher will mark potential errors as such and you are required to correct your essay and hand in a second corrected version. For the first version of your essay you can obtain a maximum of 50 points; for the second version you will receive up to 50% of the missing points.

When writing your essay, you will strive first and foremost for clarity (organization and style) and accuracy (grammar and syntax). You are encouraged to incorporate complex constructions, but please concentrate on syntactic and grammatical accuracy.

Reflective Journal

Throughout the term you will write various journal entries – independently or on given topics – to reflect on certain aspects of your stay in Berlin. Your instructor will collect these creative exercises and comment the content. However, no corrections will be made. The aim of the journal is that you learn how to express a critical and self-reflective position in a linguistically creative way.

Midterm and Final Exam

You will take a midterm and a final exam consisting of the following sections: listening comprehension, vocabulary, grammar, reading comprehension and composition based on course themes.

Group Project

Together with two or three peers you will prepare a creative and linguistically demanding oral presentation of approximately 10 minutes about your impressions of Berlin (funny, bizarre, interesting facts etc.). The projects (sketches, parodies, PowerPoint presentations, movies, songs, poems etc.) will be presented on the last day of class. Most importantly, every group member should play an active role in the presentation, i.e. should receive an equal amount of speaking time during the presentation.

Evaluation

  • Active participation and homework 250 points
  • Oral presentation (2 à 50 pts) 100 points
  • Essay (2 à 75 pts) 150 points
  • Reflective journal 100 points
  • Midterm exam 150 points
  • Final exam 150 points
  • Group project 100 points

Maximum score 1,000 points

Language of instruction: German
Course type:
Language course, C-Track
Contact hours:
180 (6 per day)
Course days
: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday
ECTS credits
: 9
Course fee:
€ 2,475
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Student Profile

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed the basic level and the first part of the intermediate level of German and who have a sound knowledge of German at the B1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. This course is intensive and is intended for dedicated, highly self-motivated students who will take responsibility for their learning.

Course Objectives

This course will help you to expand your competences in speaking and writing within six weeks, while emphasizing self-correction. Furthermore, it will help you to increase your vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and develop effective reading and listening strategies.

In addition, you will analyze and interpret cultural, political, and historical topics in German-speaking countries and compare them with your own cultural background.

  • By the end of the six-week course you will have developed and regularly use new strategies for language acquisition.
  • You will be able to engage in detailed discussions on above mentioned topics.
  • Furthermore, you will have developed reading strategies that will allow you to understand different text types in detail.
  • In addition, you will improve your essay writing skills, i.e. you will be able to write short texts on different topics, revise and proofread them.

Textbook

Sicher! B2-Kursbuch, Dr. Michaela Perlmann-Balme, Susanne Schwalb, Hueber Verlag 2014. Literary texts and supplemental materials in consultation with the course instructor.

Daily Lesson and Excursion

Monday through Friday are lessons. On four class days during the term you will go on a course-related excursion.

Attendance

Each class consists of six teaching modules (45 minutes each). If you miss 20 modules (unexcused), your entire course grade will drop by one grade. Coming more than 20 minutes late counts as missing a module (this also applies to excursion days). If you come late to class six times (up to 20 minutes) your entire course grade will also drop by one grade. If you miss 50 modules, you will fail the class.

Active Participation

We expect committed and consistent interest in the acquisition of the German language. You will prove this by participating constructively and productively in the lessons and excursions, completing homework assignments and being prepared for every class. Every student is expected to respect the ideas and comments of his/her peers.

Oral Presentation

You will prepare a five-minute and a ten-minute oral presentation. In one of them you will introduce and explain a certain topic related to Berlin. It is important that you prepare and explain for your presentation relevant vocabulary beforehand (max. 10) and that you give your peers a specific assignment. Furthermore, it is important that you speak freely rather than reading the oral presentation and that you keep to the time allowed.

Essay

In this course you will write two essays (font size 12, double-spaced, 250 – 300 words). Your teacher will mark potential errors as such and you are required to correct your essay and hand in a second corrected version. For the first version of your essay you can obtain a maximum of 50 points; for the second version you will receive up to 50% of the missing points.

When writing your essay, you will strive first and foremost for clarity (organization and style) and accuracy (grammar and syntax). You are encouraged to incorporate complex constructions, but please concentrate on syntactic and grammatical accuracy.

Reflective Journal

Throughout the term you will write various journal entries – independently or on given topics – to reflect on certain aspects of your stay in Berlin. Your instructor will collect these creative exercises and comment the content. However, no corrections will be made. The aim of the journal is that you learn how to express a critical and self-reflective position in a linguistically creative way.

Midterm and Final Exam

You will take a midterm and a final exam consisting of the following sections: listening comprehension, vocabulary, grammar, reading comprehension and composition based on course themes.

Group Project

Together with two or three peers you will prepare a creative and linguistically demanding oral presentation of approximately 10 minutes about your impressions of Berlin (funny, bizarre, interesting facts etc.). The projects (sketches, parodies, PowerPoint presentations, movies, songs, poems etc.) will be presented on the last day of class. Most importantly, every group member should play an active role in the presentation, i.e. should receive an equal amount of speaking time during the presentation.

Evaluation

  • Active participation and homework 250 points
  • Oral presentation (2 à 50 pts) 100 points
  • Essay (2 à 75 pts) 150 points
  • Reflective journal 100 points
  • Midterm exam 150 points
  • Final exam 150 points
  • Group project 100 points

Maximum score 1,000 points

Language of instruction: German
Course type:
Language course, C-Track
Contact hours:
180 (6 per day)
Course days
: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday
ECTS credits
: 9
Course fee:
€ 2,475
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Student Profile

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed the intermediate level of German and who have a sound knowledge of German at the B2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. This course is intensive and is intended for dedicated, highly self-motivated students who will take responsibility for their learning.

Course Objectives

The course aims to deepen your competence in speaking and writing and to expand and refine your vocabulary usage, so that you are able to express and discuss ideas, opinions and information at the academic level. Special attention is given to the consistent use of self-correction. Furthermore, the course helps you to develop effective reading and listening strategies and deepen your knowledge of grammar structures.

In addition, you will analyze and interpret cultural, political, and historical topics in German-speaking countries and compare them with your own cultural background.

  • By the end of the six-week course you will have developed and regularly use new strategies for language acquisition.
  • You will have improved your ability to choose the right linguistic register for different situations, topics and communication partners.
  • You will be able to lead and participate in academic discussions about certain course-related topics.
  • In addition, you will expand and refine your essay writing skills, i.e. you will be able to write, revise and proofread essays that meet the standards of academic writing.

Textbook

studio: Die Mittelstufe. Deutsch als Fremdsprache C1, Christina Kuhn, Britta Winzer-Kiontke, Cornelsen Verlag, 2015.

Literary texts and supplemental materials in consultation with the course instructor.

Daily Lesson and Excursion

Monday through Friday are lessons. On four class days during the term you will go on a course-related excursion.

Attendance

Each class consists of six teaching modules (45 minutes each). If you miss 20 modules (unexcused), your entire course grade will drop by one grade. Coming more than 20 minutes late counts as missing a module (this also applies to excursion days). If you come late to class six times (up to 20 minutes) your entire course grade will also drop by one grade. If you miss 50 modules, you will fail the class.

Active Participation

We expect committed and consistent interest in the acquisition of the German language. You will prove this by participating constructively and productively in the lessons and excursions, completing homework assignments and being prepared for every class. Every student is expected to respect the ideas and comments of his/her peers.

Oral Presentation

You will prepare two ten-minute oral presentations. You are also required to prepare a handout for your peers listing unfamiliar vocabulary (max. 20) and posing questions. Furthermore, it is important that you speak freely rather than reading the oral presentations and that you keep to the time allowed.

Essay

In preparation for your final paper, you will compose an essay in 12-font and double spaced (300-350 words). Your teacher will mark potential errors as such and you are required to correct your essay and hand in a second corrected version. For the first version of your essay you can obtain a maximum of 100 points; for the second version you will receive up to 50% of the missing points.

When writing your essay you will strive first and foremost for clarity (organization and style) and accuracy (grammar and syntax). You are encouraged to incorporate complex constructions, but please concentrate on syntactic and grammatical accuracy.

In addition, you will write a journal entry reflection on your essay and the writing process. This reflection together with your instructor’s suggestions and comments will help you to expand your essay into a research paper for the final project.

Reflective Journal

Throughout the term you will write various journal entries – independently or on given topics – to reflect on certain aspects of your stay in Berlin, e.g. question personal impressions, compare historical or contemporary phenomena, reflect on certain topics discussed in class, etc. Your instructor will collect these creative exercises and comment the content. However, no corrections will be made. The aim of the journal is that you learn how to express a critical and self-reflective position in a linguistically creative way.

Midterm

You will take a midterm exam consisting of the following sections: listening comprehension, vocabulary, grammar, reading comprehension and composition based on course themes.

Final Project

The final project will be a five-page written research paper (font size 12, double-spaced) and a five-minute in-class presentation. The final paper has to meet the standards of academic writing. In terms of content this means that a certain topic has to be investigated systematically and the results have to be presented in a structured and logical way. In terms of form it means that you keep to one single citation style and that you include all the sources you used for your research paper in a reference-list.

You will complete your final paper by executing the following steps:

  • Based on your essay you will write an outline, which will be commented by your instructor.
  • Then you will write your final paper, which will be due by the beginning of the final week of the course.
  • In class you will proofread your final paper together with your peers and check for errors in terms of content and form.
  • You will have the opportunity to revise your final paper before handing it in.

At the last day of class you will present your results in a five-minute presentation. It is important that you speak freely rather than reading your presentation and that you keep to the time allowed.

Evaluation

  • Active participation and homework 300 points
  • Oral presentation (2 à 50 pts) 100 points
  • Essay 100 points
  • Reflective journal 100 points
  • Midterm exam 150 points
  • Final project 250 points (200 final paper + 50 presentation)

Maximum score 1,000 points


Class times

Weekdays Monday, Tuesday,
Thursday and Friday
Wednesday
Teaching Hours

  9:00 - 10:30 am
11:00 am - 12:30 pm
2:00 - 3:30 pm

9:00 am - 3:30 pm
(on field trip days adaptation of class times possible)