FUBiS Term III 2020

Arrival Day/ Move-In Day: Saturday, July 18, 2020
Departure Day/ Move-Out Day: Saturday, August 15, 2020

Program structure:

  • An A-Track language course can only be combined with a B-Track subject course.
  • An A-Track subject course can only be combined with a B-Track subject course.
  • C- and D-Track courses cannot be combined with other courses.
  • The number of participants in each course is limited to 18 (15 in language courses). In exceptional cases, more participants per class may be allowed.

Course schedule


Printable version of course schedule (pdf)

A-Track Subject Courses

Instructor: Dr. Gernot Weckherlin
Language of instruction:
English
Course type:
Subject course, A-Track
Contact hours:
48 (6 per day)
Course days
: Monday & Thursday
ECTS credits
: 4
Course fee:
€ 1,100
Can be combined with all B-Track courses
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Course Description

This course gives a wide overview of the development of public and private architecture in Berlin during the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries. Following an introduction to the urban development and architectural history of the Modern era, the Neo-Classical period will be surveyed with special reference to the works of Schinkel. This will be followed by classes on architecture of the German Reich after 1871, which was characterized by both modern and conservative tendencies and the manifold activities during the time of the Weimar Republic in the 1920s such as the Housing Revolution. The architecture of the Nazi period will be examined, followed by the developments in East and West Berlin after the Second World War. The course concludes with a detailed review of the city’s more recent and current architectural profiles, including an analysis of the conflicts concerning the re-design of Berlin after the Cold War and the German reunification.

Seven walking tours to historically significant buildings and sites are included (Unter den Linden, Gendarmenmarkt, New Housing Estates, Chancellory, Potsdamer Platz, Holocaust Memorial etc.). The course aims to offer a deeper understanding of the interdependence of Berlin’s architecture and the city’s social and political structures. It considers Berlin as a model for the highways and by-ways of a European capital in modern times.

Student Profile

The course addresses students of any subject, especially History of Art, Architecture and related subjects, such as History, Design or Fine Arts. An elementary knowledge of architecture and architectural history is welcome but not necessary. More advanced students or those interested in a particular field can - on request - be given special assistance and further material for self-study.

Prerequisites

None

Required language skills

The language of instruction is English. Language proficiency on an advanced Intermediate level (Mittelstufe II) is a prerequisite for participation. For orientation purposes, you can assess your language skills here (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR).

Course requirements

Regular and active participation, Midterm exam, Final exam

Grading

  • 30% Attendance and participation
  • 30% Midterm exam
  • 40% Final exam

Reading

A course reader will be provided.

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)

Instructor: Dr. Marcus Funck
Language of instruction:
English
Course type:
Subject course, A-Track
Contact hours:
48 (6 per day)
Course days
: Monday & Thursday
ECTS credits
: 4
Course fee:
€ 1,100
Can be combined with all B-Track courses
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Course Description

The ‘thousand year Reich’ that Hitler promised when he became Chancellor of Germany in January 1933 lasted but 12 years. During this time, however, Hitler and his Nazi Party came to dominate European and even world affairs, terrorizing vast numbers of Germans, launching a devastating war, and orchestrating the murder of more than five million Jews. Yet Hitler and the Nazi Party gained the active support and involvement of most Germans. How was this possible?

This class focuses on Hitler’s Germany and it begins with the essential 19th century background. How did political anti-Semitism grow there? What shaped the social and political life? Central to this session will be a discussion of the broad political currents and the popular literature that Hitler and many of his supporters read and absorbed.

Crucial to understanding the lure of Hitler and the Nazi Party was Germany’s experience in the First World War, a conflict that decimated a generation and destroyed Europe as it was known. Germany became a democratic state, but was torn by political divisions and dissatisfaction. In this climate of uncertainty and despair, Hitler and the Nazi Party grew from a small group on the radical fringe in Munich to a national force. How did this happen? Those traits of Hitler crucial to his success, particularly his charisma, will be defined and analyzed within the broader political context of Weimar political life.

In late January 1933 Hitler gained the long desired but elusive goal: he became chancellor of Germany, the leader of a coalition government. Much attention will be paid to how Hitler, his cabinet, and supporters were able to consolidate the control over the state and society within a matter of months. This came at the cost of political liberties, through the growing use of terror, oppression, and intimidation. Yet, Hitler gained supporters as he seemingly offered economic stability and a new unity to the German people. How the regime solidified its control over society and political life will be examined and discussed at length in this session.

A key element of Hitler’s rule was the concentration camp system, what came to be a vast chain of prisons and centers of oppression and death. How this developed will be examined and analyzed.

Hitler’s ambitions, the conquest of ‘living space’ in Eastern Europe and the annihilation of the Jews, motivated his foreign ambitions and led directly to World War II, the most destructive conflict in human history. A central element of the war was the Holocaust, the all-out program to destroy the Jews of Europe. The session will examine closely these developments, the nature of the war, how the Holocaust was implemented, and the role that terror played in sustaining Nazi rule. We will also discuss the measures taken against the handicapped, homosexuals, Sinti and Roma.

In Germany and later in occupied Europe opposition and resistance emerged and challenged Nazi rule. Opponents were motivated by a variety of reasons, some personal, some political, and these too will be discussed.

Lastly, the class will examine the end of the war, the so-called ‘zero hour’ in Germany, the destruction and collapse of Germany, and then how this nation has dealt with the legacy of Hitler and Nazi rule.

We will be visiting local museums, historical sites and locations that reveal the operations of Nazi rule. These visits are a key element of the class and the experience of studying in Berlin.

Student Profile

We welcome students from all disciplines who are interested in gaining an insight into the operations and dynamics of Nazi rule in Germany, its attempt to annihilate the Jews and to dominate the continent.

Prerequisites

Interest and curiosity

Required language skills

The language of instruction is English. Language proficiency on an advanced Intermediate level (Mittelstufe II) is a prerequisite for participation. For orientation purposes, you can assess your language skills here (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR).

Course Requirements

Attendance in class, the careful reading of the assigned course materials, participation in the field trips, the discussion of the material in class, the completion of two short research papers (2-4 pages), and the final examination. Guidelines for the papers as well as suggested topics will be provided during the first session.

Grading

  • Class participation: 20%
  • Two short papers: 40%
  • Final exam: 40%

Reading

A course reader will be provided at the first meeting of the class. This includes a recent monograph on Nazi Germany, a selection of articles offering the newest research and insights, excerpts from original documents (in translation), a weekly schedule of the readings and a series of questions as a guide through each of the texts.

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)

Instructor: Prof. Helen E. Hartnell, J.D.
Language of instruction:
English
Course type:
Subject course, A-Track
Contact hours:
48 (6 per day)
Course days
: Monday & Thursday
ECTS credits
: 4
Course fee:
€ 1,100
Can be combined with all B-Track courses
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Course Description

This course explores theoretical and historical perspectives on the intersection of law, society and politics, and aims to foster discussion of contemporary issues among students from different cultures and disciplines. After an introduction to comparative law and legal culture, we read some classical social theorists (Durkheim, Weber and Marx), and consider their relevance to contemporary debates about morality, (dis)obedience, conflict, and property. Next, we investigate the role and operation of law in totalitarian settings such as Nazi and Communist Germany. Finally, we consider the difficulties that such legacies pose for democracy, the rule of law, and the economy in post-totalitarian societies. In this context, we examine the need for ‘transitional justice’, the relationship between law and the market, and the challenges posed by freedom of speech.

Overall, the course aims to develop skills at using theory and history to inform debates on contemporary challenges, such as multiculturalism, punishment, (illegal) downloading/streaming/file-sharing, and economic development. In addition to gaining substantive expertise in various socio- and politico-legal fields, students develop communicative competence through participatory exercises, and intercultural competence through discussion with other students.

Student Profile

This course is designed for all students with an interest in social sciences – in particular, history, sociology or political science – or in law. It is conceived as an undergraduate class, but the variety of students taking this course typically ranges from first-year students to post-graduate students. This experiential diversity provides unique opportunities for students to learn from one another.

Prerequisites

No prior knowledge of law or of social science is required; the only prerequisite is an open mind.

Required language skills

The language of instruction is English. Language proficiency on an advanced Intermediate level (Mittelstufe II) is a prerequisite for participation. For orientation purposes, you can assess your language skills here (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR).

Course Requirements

Students are expected to attend each class; read the literature assigned for each class; and participate in class discussions and excursions. In addition, each student must complete a writing assignment (written protocol of 5-7 double-spaced pages) analyzing some of the assigned readings. Finally, each student is required to take a written final examination.

Grading

The grade for this course will be based on:

  • 40 % Class attendance and participation     
  • 25 % Written protocol       
  • 35 % Final exam 

Reading

Readings for the course will be contained in a reader that will be provided at orientation.

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)

Instructor: Dr. Lauren van Vuuren
Language of instruction:
English
Course type:
Subject course, A-Track
Contact hours:
48 (6 per day)
Course days
: Monday & Thursday
ECTS credits
: 4
Course fee:
€ 1,100
Can be combined with all B-Track courses
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Course Description

This course is about Berlin, and the story of its tumultuous and epoch defining twentieth century. We examine this history through various lenses: the biographies of individuals, the words of writers who bore witness to the vertiginous social, political and physical changes the city underwent, and buildings and monuments whose physical construction, destruction and reconstruction reflected the ideological turmoil and conflict of twentieth century Berlin.

Famous Berliners we will meet include the murdered Communist leader Rosa Luxemburg, the artist Käthe Kollwitz, the actress Marlene Dietrich, the Nazi filmmaker Leni Riefenstahl, the adopted Berliner David Bowie and the famous East German dissident musician Wolf Biermann. The contextualized stories of these individuals will offer us unique perspectives politically, artistically and socially into the tumult and struggle that marked their times in the city. These figures occupy a range of different position(s) as Berliners, as radicals, as artists of resistance to or collaboration with Nazism, and Communism, as drifters and exiles whose stories reflect Berlin’s unique position in the twentieth century as ‘no man’s land, frontier, a city adrift in the sands of Central Europe.’

In a similar way, we will examine the words of writers who bore witness to the extremism and societal upheaval that marked twentieth century Berlin. From the witnessing of Roth and Isherwood to life in Weimar and Nazi Berlin, to the social and political commentary by Christa Wolf on the moral struggles of life lived on different sides of the Berlin Wall, we will assess their writings in their historical contexts. We will assess their words as evocations of Berlin, but also as potential or overt acts of resistance to the extremism they lived under, that attempted to maintain a solidarity with the idea of Berlin as a place of artistic and social freedom and permissiveness.

Finally, we will discover the story of places in Berlin whose physical building, destruction and rebuilding can be situated in the wider systems of ideology, power and social relations that so cataclysmically defined the physical landscape of Berlin after 1933. In this, we will focus on the story of Potsdamer Platz, the Palace of the People and as an opposite postscript to Berlin’s twentieth century, the Holocaust Memorial in Mitte.

This course does not seek to provide a ‘grand narrative’ of Berlin’s twentieth century history. Instead, it follows a thread that weaves through the history: the thread left behind by those who bore witness to their times. By tracing the stories of contemporary witnesses, left for us in books, films and songs, and in the physical construction of the city, we open up a human dimension that enriches and challenges our understanding of Berlin’s traumatic recent history.

Structured largely chronologically, the course will work with films and novels whilst building on a clear historiographical base provided in class seminars. The teaching will be augmented by physical excursions into Berlin to trace the stories we encounter and class discussions will form the basis for a seminar paper that students will be required to submit at the end of the course. This history course approaches the story of Berlin through the reflections and refractions of individual humans’ lives who struggled upon the immense stage of a city at the very symbolic and literal heart of the catastrophes of the twentieth century.

Student Profile

This course is for university level students with open minds and incurable curiosity about the world around them.

Prerequisites

Interest in Berlin, and its extraordinary recent past.

Required language skills

The language of instruction is English. Language proficiency on an advanced Intermediate level (Mittelstufe II) is a prerequisite for participation. For orientation purposes, you can assess your language skills here (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR).

Course Requirements

Attendance in class and the careful reading of the assigned course materials are most important. The reading pack will be divided into compulsory and supplementary readings. Furthermore, the course will require participation in the field trips, engaged discussion of the material in class that shows you have completed the required reading, and the completion of a final paper on a topic related to the course but decided by yourself in discussion with the lecturer. Guidelines for the papers as well as suggested topics will be distributed during the first session. The instructor will be available for student consultations should any further guidance be required.

Grading

  • 20% Class participation
  • 20% Short presentation
  • 60% Research paper

‘Class Participation’ will include participation in field trips and engagement in discussion in class. ‘Short Presentation’ will be a brief presentation whereby students will describe the topic they have chosen for their research paper, and link their choice to themes in the course that they have found interesting. It will provide a useful chance for feedback and discussion within the group as a whole.

Reading

A course reader will be provided at the orientation meeting.

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)

Instructor: Dr. Andrzej Ancygier
Language of instruction:
English
Course type:
Subject course, A-Track
Contact hours:
48 (6 per day)
Course days
: Monday & Thursday
ECTS credits
: 4
Course fee:
€ 1,100
Can be combined with all B-Track courses
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Course Description

The course introduces students to the politics, governance and ethics of sustainability. The key challenges of our time are global by nature. However, the current system of global governance based on sovereign states (often in competition with each other) is ill equipped to face global challenges such as poverty, climate change, environmental degradation and availability of resources. While states struggle to provide a sustainable future for their citizens, they are increasingly forced into a logic of sustainability for all people and responsibility for the global commons. This new logic is based on the concept of interconnectedness and the impact of our actions on the generations to come.

The course examines major current global challenges divided into economic, political and environmental issues. Climate change is only one of many environmental issues facing our planet, but due to its importance and overwhelming impact, it will be given the main focus of this course. We will not only look at the science behind and consequences of global warming, but will also study the two pillars of the global climate governance: the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) and the UNFCCC (United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change). The analysis of the UNFCCC process will further lead us to review the Paris Agreement from 2015. We will discuss how effective it can be in dealing with one of the biggest threats of the 21st century and whether it can still achieve its goal of limiting global warming to “well below 2°C/1.5°C”.

A special session will be devoted to technological, political, social and economic solutions to environmental issues. Do we – as purported by some – need to replace capitalism and stop economic growth in order to prevent further environmental destruction? Or is there a way to move towards a “green growth”, and utilize the benefits of the free market to increase environmental protection? This will lead us to the question of what the future will look like. Will we continue to cross planetary boundaries and endanger the capability of different ecosystems? Or will the 21st century witness a major shift away from fossil fuels and environmental destruction to a more sustainable economy?

The discussions in the class will be complemented by at least two field trips and possibly a visit of a guest speaker.  

Student Profile

The course is designed for students with different academic backgrounds and a general interest in sustainability and sustainable development. There are no special prerequisites for the course.

Prerequisites

None

Required language skills

The language of instruction is English. Language proficiency on an advanced Intermediate level (Mittelstufe II) is a prerequisite for participation. For orientation purposes, you can assess your language skills here (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR).

Course Requirements

1.) Attendance and class participation

2.) Test

3.) Presentation

Grading

  • 40% Attendance and class participation
  • 30% Test
  • 30% Presentation

Reading

A course reader will be provided.

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)

Instructor: Dr. Burcin Col
Language of instruction:
English
Course type:
Subject course, A-Track
Contact hours:
48 (6 per day)
Course days
: Monday & Thursday
ECTS credits
: 4
Course fee:
€ 1,100
Can be combined with all B-Track courses
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Course Description

This course is designed to introduce students to the global financial environment with a special focus on Europe and Eurozone issues. The course aims to provide the analytical tools needed to understand international financial markets as well as the institutional and economic forces affecting them. To this goal, we will cover a number of topics related to the international environment that deal with financial institutions and economic concepts such as exchange rates, their determination and the relationship with interest rates and inflation rates. We will relate the fundamental topics to current debates on Eurozone crisis, the potential economic impact of Brexit and the future of crypto currencies.

The class will include lectures, small group studies, case-study analysis, group presentations and field trips. Course readings from the financial press (i.e. Financial Times, The Economist) will be timely provided. The nature of the class will be interactive as students are expected to read the material prior to class and to contribute to the class discussions or engage in formal debates. The field trips to various European economic research institutes and policy centers, foreign exchange departments of leading financial institutions and Fintech startups in Berlin will help complement and enrich the classroom material.

Student Profile

Students interested in macroeconomic policies and factors that impact international financial markets and firms operating in a global environment. A prior knowledge in economics or finance would serve as an advantage but is not required.

Prerequisites

None

Required language skills

The language of instruction is English. Language proficiency on an advanced Intermediate level (Mittelstufe II) is a prerequisite for participation. For orientation purposes, you can assess your language skills here (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR).

Course Requirements

This course will employ a mixture of in-class assignments and quizzes, class discussions, a group project presentation, a midterm and a final exam.

Grading

  • 20 % Classroom Participation             
  • 20% Group Project Presentation                          
  • 10% Assignments and Quizzes                                
  • 25% Midterm Exam                                             
  • 25% Final Exam                                                   

Reading

A course reader will be provided.

In addition, the instructor will assign articles from the financial and economic press. They will be discussed in class and student discussions will be graded. Based on the articles, at times, students will form arguments and engage in formal debates on current issues.

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)

A-Track Language Courses

Language of instruction: German
Course type:
Language course, A-Track
Contact hours:
72 (6 per day)
Course days
: Monday, Wednesday & Thursday
ECTS credits
: 4
Course fee:
€ 1,100
Can be combined with all B-Track courses
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Student Profile

This course is designed for the beginner student with no previous knowledge of German.

Course Objectives

Within four weeks, this course will help you to develop basic competences in listening, speaking, reading and writing as well as a basic knowledge of the German culture.

  • By the end of the course you will be able to deal with everyday situations in a German-speaking environment and to conduct simple conversations.
  • You will have developed reading strategies that allow you to understand simple newspaper and magazine articles as well as short literary texts.
  • In addition, you will learn to write, revise and proofread short texts in German.
  • Finally, you will be able to understand discussions on familiar topics.

Textbook

studio [21] Grundstufe A1: Gesamtband. Das Deutschbuch, Hermann Funk, Christina Kuhn, Laura Nielsen, Kerstin Rische, Cornelsen Verlag, 2015.

Literary texts and supplemental materials in consultation with the course instructor.

Daily Lesson and Excursion

Lessons take place Monday, Wednesday and Thursday. On two class days during the term you will go on a course-related excursion.

Attendance

Each class consists of six teaching modules (45 minutes each). If you miss 8 modules (unexcused), your entire course grade will drop by one grade. Coming more than 20 minutes late counts as missing a module (this also applies to excursion days). If you come late to class six times (up to 20 minutes) your entire course grade will also drop by one grade. If you miss 20 modules, you will fail the class.

Active Participation

We expect committed and consistent interest in the acquisition of the German language. You will prove this by participating constructively and productively in the lessons and excursions, completing homework assignments and being prepared for every class. Every student is expected to respect the ideas and comments of his/her peers.

Oral Presentation

You will prepare a three-minute oral presentation. It is important that you speak freely rather than reading the oral presentation and that you keep to the time allowed.

Essay

In this course you will write one essay (font size 12, double-spaced, 100 – 150 words). Your teacher will mark potential errors as such and you are required to correct your essay and hand in a second corrected version. For the first version of your essay you can obtain a maximum of 100 points; for the second version you will receive up to 50% of the missing points.

When writing your essay, you will strive first and foremost for clarity (organization and style) and accuracy (grammar and syntax).

Reflective Journal

Throughout the term you will write various journal entries – independently or on given topics – to reflect on certain aspects of your stay in Berlin. Your instructor will collect these creative exercises and comment the content. However, no corrections will be made. The aim of the journal is that you develop awareness of the language(s) surrounding you.

Midterm and Final Exam

You will take a midterm and a final exam consisting of the following sections: listening comprehension, vocabulary, grammar, reading comprehension and composition based on course themes.

Group Project

Together with two or three peers you will prepare a creative and linguistically demanding oral presentation of approximately 10 minutes about your impressions of Berlin (funny, bizarre, interesting facts etc.). The projects (sketches, parodies, PowerPoint presentations, movies, songs, poems etc.) will be presented on the last day of class. Most importantly, every group member should play an active role in the presentation, i.e. should receive an equal amount of speaking time during the presentation.

Evaluation

  • Active participation and homework 300 points
  • Oral presentation 100 points
  • Essay 100 points
  • Reflective Journal 100 points
  • Midterm exam 150 points
  • Final exam 150 points
  • Group project 100 points

Maximum score: 1,000 points

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)

Language of instruction: German
Course type:
Language course, A-Track
Contact hours:
72 (6 per day)
Course days
: Monday, Wednesday & Thursday
ECTS credits
: 4
Course fee:
€ 1,100
Can be combined with all B-Track courses
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Student Profile

This course is designed for beginners with basic knowledge of German.

Course Objectives

This course will help you to expand your competences in listening, speaking, reading and writing within four weeks, deepen your knowledge of grammar as well as your knowledge of the German culture.

  • By the end of the four-week course you will be able to deal with everyday situations in a German-speaking environment and to conduct simple conversations.
  • You will have developed reading strategies that allow you to understand simple newspaper and magazine articles as well as short literary texts more detailed.
  • In addition, you will improve your essay writing skills, which means you will be able to write short texts on different topics, revise and proofread them.
  • Finally, you will be able to understand discussions on familiar topics more detailed.

Textbook

studio [21] Grundstufe A2: Gesamtband. Das Deutschbuch, Hermann Funk, Christina Kuhn, Cornelsen Verlag, 2015.

Literary texts and supplemental materials in consultation with the course instructor.

Daily Lesson and Excursion

Lessons take place Monday, Wednesday and Thursday. On two class days during the term you will go on a course-related excursion.

Attendance

Each class consists of six teaching modules (45 minutes each). If you miss 8 modules (unexcused), your entire course grade will drop by one grade. Coming more than 20 minutes late counts as missing a module (this also applies to excursion days). If you come late to class six times (up to 20 minutes) your entire course grade will also drop by one grade. If you miss 20 modules, you will fail the class.

Active Participation

We expect committed and consistent interest in the acquisition of the German language. You will prove this by participating constructively and productively in the lessons and excursions, completing homework assignments and being prepared for every class. Every student is expected to respect the ideas and comments of his/her peers.

Oral Presentation

You will prepare a five-minute oral presentation. It is important that you speak freely rather than reading the oral presentation and that you keep to the time allowed.

Essay

In this course you will write one essay (font size 12, double-spaced, 150 – 200 words). Your teacher will mark potential errors as such and you are required to correct your essay and hand in a second corrected version. For the first version of your essay you can obtain a maximum of 100 points; for the second version you will receive up to 50% of the missing points.

When writing your essay, you will strive first and foremost for clarity (organization and style) and accuracy (grammar and syntax).

Reflective Journal

Throughout the term you will write various journal entries – independently or on given topics – to reflect on certain aspects of your stay in Berlin. Your instructor will collect these creative exercises and comment the content. However, no corrections will be made. The aim of the journal is that you develop awareness of the language(s) surrounding you.

Midterm and Final Exam

You will take a midterm and a final exam consisting of the following sections: listening comprehension, vocabulary, grammar, reading comprehension and composition based on course themes.

Group Project

Together with two or three peers you will prepare a creative and linguistically demanding oral presentation of approximately 10 minutes about your impressions of Berlin (funny, bizarre, interesting facts etc.). The projects (sketches, parodies, PowerPoint presentations, movies, songs, poems etc.) will be presented on the last day of class. Most importantly, every group member should play an active role in the presentation, i.e. should receive an equal amount of speaking time during the presentation.

Evaluation

  • Active participation and homework 300 points
  • Oral presentation 100 points
  • Essay 100 points
  • Reflective journal 100 points
  • Midterm exam 150 points
  • Final exam 150 points
  • Group project 100 points

Maximum score: 1,000 points

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)

Language of instruction: German
Course type:
Language course, A-Track
Contact hours:
72 (6 per day)
Course days
: Monday, Wednesday & Thursday
ECTS credits
: 4
Course fee:
€ 1,100
Can be combined with all B-Track courses
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Student Profile

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed the basic level of German and who have a sound knowledge of German at the A2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

Course Objectives

Within four weeks, this course will help you to expand your competences in listening, speaking, reading and writing, strengthen your knowledge of grammar, while emphasizing self-correction, as well as deepen your knowledge of the German culture.

  • Furthermore, you will analyze and interpret cultural, political, and historical topics in German-speaking countries and compare them with your own cultural background.
  • By the end of the four-week course you will have developed and regularly use new strategies for language acquisition.
  • You will be able to engage in detailed discussions on above mentioned topics.
  • Furthermore, you will have developed reading strategies that will allow you to understand different text types in detail.
  • In addition, you will improve your essay writing skills, i.e. you will be able to write short texts on different topics, revise and proofread them.

Textbook

studio [21] Grundstufe B1: Gesamtband. Das Deutschbuch, Hermann Funk, Christina Kuhn, Britta Winzer-Kiontke, Cornelsen Verlag, 2015.

Literary texts and supplemental materials in consultation with the course instructor.

Daily Lesson and Excursion

Lessons take place Monday, Wednesday and Thursday. On two class days during the term you will go on a course-related excursion.

Attendance

Each class consists of six teaching modules (45 minutes each). If you miss 8 modules (unexcused), your entire course grade will drop by one grade. Coming more than 20 minutes late counts as missing a module (this also applies to excursion days). If you come late to class six times (up to 20 minutes) your entire course grade will also drop by one grade. If you miss 20 modules, you will fail the class.

Active Participation

We expect committed and consistent interest in the acquisition of the German language. You will prove this by participating constructively and productively in the lessons and excursions, completing homework assignments and being prepared for every class. Every student is expected to respect the ideas and comments of his/her peers.

Oral Presentation

You will prepare a ten-minute oral presentation. It is important that you prepare and explain for your presentation relevant vocabulary beforehand (max. 5 – 7) and that you give your peers a specific assignment. Furthermore, it is important that you speak freely rather than reading the oral presentation and that you keep to the time allowed.

Essay

In this course you will write one essay (font size 12, double-spaced, 200 – 250 words). Your teacher will mark potential errors as such and you are required to correct your essay and hand in a second corrected version. For the first version of your essay you can obtain a maximum of 100 points; for the second version you will receive up to 50% of the missing points.

When writing your essay, you will strive first and foremost for clarity (organization and style) and accuracy (grammar and syntax). You are encouraged to incorporate complex constructions, but please concentrate on syntactic and grammatical accuracy.

Reflective Journal

Throughout the term you will write various journal entries – independently or on given topics – to reflect on certain aspects of your stay in Berlin. Your instructor will collect these creative exercises and comment the content. However, no corrections will be made. The aim of the journal is that you learn how to express a critical and self-reflective position in a linguistically creative way.

Midterm and Final Exam

You will take a midterm and a final exam consisting of the following sections: listening comprehension, vocabulary, grammar, reading comprehension and composition based on course themes.

Group Project

Together with two or three peers you will prepare a creative and linguistically demanding oral presentation of approximately 10 minutes about your impressions of Berlin (funny, bizarre, interesting facts etc.). The projects (sketches, parodies, PowerPoint presentations, movies, songs, poems etc.) will be presented on the last day of class. Most importantly, every group member should play an active role in the presentation, i.e. should receive an equal amount of speaking time during the presentation.

Evaluation

  • Active participation and homework 300 points
  • Oral presentation 100 points
  • Essay 100 points
  • Reflective journal 100 points
  • Midterm exam 150 points
  • Final exam 150 points
  • Group project 100 points

Maximum score: 1,000 points

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)

Language of instruction: German
Course type:
Language course, A-Track
Contact hours:
72 (6 per day)
Course days
: Monday, Wednesday & Thursday
ECTS credits
: 4
Course fee:
€ 1,100
Can be combined with all B-Track courses
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Student Profile

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed the basic level and the first part of the intermediate level of German and who have a sound knowledge of German at the B1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

Course Objectives

Within four weeks, this course will help you to expand your competences in speaking and writing while emphasizing self-correction. Furthermore, it will help you to increase your vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and develop effective reading and listening strategies.

In addition, you will analyze and interpret cultural, political, and historical topics in German-speaking countries and compare them with your own cultural background.

  • By the end of the four-week course you will have developed and regularly use new strategies for language acquisition.
  • You will be able to engage in detailed discussions on above mentioned topics.
  • Furthermore, you will have developed reading strategies that will allow you to understand different text types in detail.
  • In addition, you will improve your essay writing skills, i.e. you will be able to write short texts on different topics, revise and proofread them.

Textbook

Sicher! B2-Kursbuch, Dr. Michaela Perlmann-Balme, Susanne Schwalb, Hueber Verlag, 2014.

Literary texts and supplemental materials in consultation with the course instructor.

Daily Lesson and Excursion

Lessons take place Monday, Wednesday and Thursday. On two class days during the term you will go on a course-related excursion.

Attendance

Each class consists of six teaching modules (45 minutes each). If you miss 8 modules (unexcused), your entire course grade will drop by one grade. Coming more than 20 minutes late counts as missing a module (this also applies to excursion days). If you come late to class six times (up to 20 minutes) your entire course grade will also drop by one grade. If you miss 20 modules, you will fail the class.

Active Participation

We expect committed and consistent interest in the acquisition of the German language. You will prove this by participating constructively and productively in the lessons and excursions, completing homework assignments and being prepared for every class. Every student is expected to respect the ideas and comments of his/her peers.

Oral Presentation

You will prepare a ten-minute oral presentation. It is important that you prepare and explain for your presentation relevant vocabulary beforehand (max. 10) and that you give your peers a specific assignment. Furthermore, it is important that you speak freely rather than reading the oral presentation and that you keep to the time allowed.

Essay

In this course you will write one essay (font size 12, double-spaced, 250 – 300 words). Your teacher will mark potential errors as such and you are required to correct your essay and hand in a second corrected version. For the first version of your essay you can obtain a maximum of 100 points; for the second version you will receive up to 50% of the missing points. When writing your essay, you will strive first and foremost for clarity (organization and style) and accuracy (grammar and syntax). You are encouraged to incorporate complex constructions, but please concentrate on syntactic and grammatical accuracy.

Reflective Journal

Throughout the term you will write various journal entries – independently or on given topics – to reflect on certain aspects of your stay in Berlin. Your instructor will collect these creative exercises and comment the content. However, no corrections will be made. The aim of the journal is that you learn how to express a critical and self-reflective position in a linguistically creative way.

Midterm and Final Exam

You will take a midterm and a final exam consisting of the following sections: listening comprehension, vocabulary, grammar, reading comprehension and composition based on course themes.

Group Project

Together with two or three peers you will prepare a creative and linguistically demanding oral presentation of approximately 10 minutes about your impressions of Berlin (funny, bizarre, interesting facts etc.). The projects (sketches, parodies, PowerPoint presentations, movies, songs, poems etc.) will be presented on the last day of class. Most importantly, every group member should play an active role in the presentation, i.e. should receive an equal amount of speaking time during the presentation.

Evaluation

  • Active participation and homework 300 points
  • Oral presentation 100 points
  • Essay 100 points
  • Reflective journal 100 points
  • Midterm exam 150 points
  • Final exam 150 points
  • Group project 100 points

Maximum score: 1,000 points

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)

Language of instruction: German
Course type:
Language course, A-Track
Contact hours:
72 (6 per day)
Course days
: Monday, Wednesday & Thursday
ECTS credits
: 4
Course fee:
€ 1,100
Can be combined with all B-Track courses
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Student Profile

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed the intermediate level of German and who have a sound knowledge of German at the B2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

Course Objectives

The course aims to deepen your competence in speaking and writing and to expand and refine your vocabulary usage, so that you are able to express and discuss ideas, opinions and information at the academic level. Special attention is given to the consistent use of self-correction. Furthermore, the course helps you to develop effective reading and listening strategies and deepen your knowledge of grammar structures.

In addition, you will analyze and interpret cultural, political, and historical topics in German-speaking countries and compare them with your own cultural background.

  • By the end of the four-week course you will have developed and regularly use new strategies for language acquisition.
  • You will have improved your ability to choose the right linguistic register for different situations, topics and communication partners.
  • You will be able to lead and participate in academic discussions about certain course-related topics.
  • In addition, you will expand and refine your essay writing skills, i.e. you will be able to write, revise and proofread essays that meet the standards of academic writing.

Textbook

studio: Die Mittelstufe. Deutsch als Fremdsprache C1, Christina Kuhn, Britta Winzer-Kiontke, Cornelsen Verlag, 2015.

Literary texts and supplemental materials in consultation with the course instructor.

Daily Lesson and Excursion

Lessons take place Monday, Wednesday and Thursday. On two class days during the term you will go on a course-related excursion.

Attendance

Each class consists of six teaching modules (45 minutes each). If you miss 8 modules (unexcused), your entire course grade will drop by one grade. Coming more than 20 minutes late counts as missing a module (this also applies to excursion days). If you come late to class six times (up to 20 minutes) your entire course grade will also drop by one grade. If you miss 20 modules, you will fail the class.

Active Participation

We expect committed and consistent interest in the acquisition of the German language. You will prove this by participating constructively and productively in the lessons and excursions, completing homework assignments and being prepared for every class. Every student is expected to respect the ideas and comments of his/her peers.

Oral Presentation

You will prepare a ten-minute oral presentation. You are also required to prepare a handout for your peers listing unfamiliar vocabulary (max. 20) and posing questions. Furthermore, it is important that you speak freely rather than reading the oral presentations and that you keep to the time allowed.

Essay

In preparation for your final paper, you will compose an essay in 12-font and double spaced (300-350 words). Your teacher will mark potential errors as such and you are required to correct your essay and hand in a second corrected version. For the first version of your essay you can obtain a maximum of 100 points; for the second version you will receive up to 50% of the missing points.

When writing your essay you will strive first and foremost for clarity (organization and style) and accuracy (grammar and syntax). You are encouraged to incorporate complex constructions, but please concentrate on syntactic and grammatical accuracy.

In addition, you will write a journal entry reflection on your essay and the writing process. This reflection together with your instructor’s suggestions and comments will help you to expand your essay into a research paper for the final project.

Reflective Journal

Throughout the term you will write various journal entries – independently or on given topics – to reflect on certain aspects of your stay in Berlin, e.g. question personal impressions, compare historical or contemporary phenomena, reflect on certain topics discussed in class, etc. Your instructor will collect these creative exercises and comment the content. However, no corrections will be made. The aim of the journal is that you learn how to express a critical and self-reflective position in a linguistically creative way.

Midterm Exam

You will take a midterm exam consisting of the following sections: listening comprehension, vocabulary, grammar, reading comprehension and composition based on course themes.

Final Project

The final project will be a three-page written research paper (font size 12, double-spaced) and a five-minute in-class presentation. The final paper has to meet the standards of academic writing. In terms of content this means that a certain topic has to be investigated systematically and the results have to be presented in a structured and logical way. In terms of form it means that you keep to one single citation style and that you include all the sources you used for your research paper in a reference-list.

You will complete your final paper by executing the following steps:

  • Based on your essay you will write an outline, which will be commented by your instructor.
  • Then you will write your final paper, which will be due by the beginning of the final week of the course.
  • In class you will proofread your final paper together with your peers and check for errors in terms of content and form.
  • You will have the opportunity to revise your final paper before handing it in.

At the last day of class you will present your results in a five-minute presentation. It is important that you speak freely rather than reading your presentation and that you keep to the time allowed.

Evaluation

  • Active participation and homework 300 points
  • Oral presentation 100 points
  • Essay 100 points
  • Reflective journal 100 points
  • Midterm exam 150 points
  • Final project 250 points (200 final paper + 50 presentation)

Maximum score: 1,000 points

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)

B-Track Subject Courses

Instructor: Dr. Robert Teigrob
Language of instruction:
English
Course type:
Subject course, B-Track
Contact hours:
48 (6 per day)
Course days
: Tuesday & Friday
ECTS credits
: 4
Course fee:
€ 1,100
Can be combined with all A-Track courses
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Course Description

Over the course of the Cold War, the city of Berlin was frequently at the centre of global tensions and a potential front line should the superpower rivalry descend into actual war. This course utilizes the city of Berlin as a laboratory in which to examine the origins, nature, and conclusion of the Cold War that defined international relations between 1945 and 1991. We analyze the Allied occupation of the city following the Nazi defeat, the Berlin blockade and airlift that helped solidify the divisions between East and West. Next, we will examine the workers’ uprising of 1953 that provoked a Soviet military response. The following sessions will deal with the emigration crisis of the late 1950s that led the Soviets to first threaten a military takeover of the city and eventually to construct the Berlin Wall. Finally, we will look at the fall of the wall and the subsequent reunification of Berlin and Germany.

Field trips to important Cold War sites will permit students to gain a deeper appreciation of how the Cold War changed Berlin, and how events in Berlin influenced the wider international struggle. In order to place the interests and goals of the superpowers in context, we will also discuss the ways in which the Cold War rivalry affected Europe as a whole, as well as Asia and Latin America. Attention will be given to the role of international organizations such as the United Nations in world affairs, and the changes brought about by the collapse of communism in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. In this way, we will examine the roots of contemporary crises. Students will gain an understanding of the recent past, which will help equip them to evaluate the current and emerging international order.

Student Profile

Everyone is welcome to this course. It is ideal for students who have background in modern international relations history and supplements courses on the world wars or global politics/history. However, the course is designed for those without such training who have an interest in international relations. Students planning careers in diplomacy, journalism, or academia will find this course especially beneficial.

Prerequisites

None

Required language skills

The language of instruction is English. Language proficiency on an advanced Intermediate level (Mittelstufe II) is a prerequisite for participation. For orientation purposes, you can assess your language skills here (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR).

Course Requirements

This course uses a lecture format with seminars, as well as field trips around Berlin. There is much to cover in a short period of time. Regular attendance will be essential to keep up with the volume of material and pace of the course. As participatory seminars make up a sizeable portion of the overall grade you will be expected to have completed all the readings, integrate them with lectures, and come ready to discuss the topics.

Grading

  • 30% Active participation
  • 20% One short essay
  • 50% Final exam

Reading

Scholarly readings are an essential component of any course and this will be no different. A course reader will be made available. All the seminars will involve chapters from a book by a renowned academic in the field. They will also entail the reading of primary documents on various events in the Cold War put together in an edited text. This will provide students an opportunity to be “closer” to some of the dramatic events covered in the course and be exposed to the true craft of historians.

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)

Instructor: Dr. Imran G. Chowdhury
Language of instruction:
English
Course type:
Subject course, B-Track
Contact hours:
48 (6 per day)
Course days
: Tuesday & Friday
ECTS credits
: 4
Course fee:
€ 1,100
Can be combined with all A-Track courses
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Course Description

Europe encompasses the world’s largest and most complicated market. Recent events, particularly those following the ongoing economic crisis on the continent, raise profound questions about the future of Europe. This course will focus on present and future business issues facing the entire continent. Under this focus, we will examine the following questions: Should a “European” management style be developed instead of the national practices that frequently characterize companies originating in different European nations? How and under what circumstances should the European Union expand to Turkey, Ukraine and other countries in the East? What has been the impact of the Treaty of Lisbon, in effect since 2009, on European economic, political and social issues? In order to provide essential background and context for these issues, we will also review key events in modern European History.

In class, we will utilize a variety of approaches, including small-group study, lectures, and case-study analysis, to develop a comprehensive understanding of European business.On excursions to different districts of Berlin, we will study how European and German history have influenced the economic development of this magnificent international capital and we will investigate the impact Berlin has in turn had on European business management. Our visit to the DDR Museum will allow us to examine life in the former East Germany. At the Museum of Communication, we will analyse how European technology has affected the international telecommunications industry. Our trip to the European School of Management and Technology (ESMT) will put us at the heart of European business as it has evolved in the post-German-unification period. Finally, a field trip to visit a local entrepreneur in the heart of the city will allow us to see the emerging role of entrepreneurship in shaping the business landscape of the continent.

Student Profile

Students interested in how companies manage their businesses as the dynamic European economy continues its transformation from national- to European-level markets and spheres of interaction. The course also examines macro-level social, historical, and economic factors and their contribution to the contemporary European business environment.  

Prerequisites

None

Required language skills

The language of instruction is English. Language proficiency on an advanced Intermediate level (Mittelstufe II) is a prerequisite for participation. For orientation purposes, you can assess your language skills here (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR).

Course Requirements

Complete reading assignments and discuss in class. Prepare a group presentation, and take two exams.

Grading

  • 20% Classroom Participation
  • 20% Group Presentation
  • 30% Mid-Term Exam
  • 30% Final Exam

Reading

A course reader will be provided.

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)

Instructor: Dr. Ulrich Brückner
Language of instruction:
English
Course type:
Subject course, B-Track
Contact hours:
48 (6 per day)
Course days
: Tuesday & Friday
ECTS credits
: 4
Course fee:
€ 1,100
Can be combined with all A-Track courses
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Course Description

The course will introduce the basics of the European Union and describe and explain the processes of widening and deepening of this unique political entity. This will cover an overview of European Union history, its evolution in economic and political terms as well as of its institutional structure up to today.

Internal politics and policies, for example the decision-making process, the balance of power, identity and democratic questions in this new system of governance will be discussed. Likewise in the realm of external affairs, the Common Foreign and Security Policy, relations with neighbors and with developing countries will be our concern. Particularly important aspects include the discussion on future expansion as well as the consequences of the financial crisis and the Lisbon Treaty. If students express specific interests in other topics or case studies sessions can be adjusted.

The morning sessions consist of lectures, literature based discussions and oral presentations from working groups. After lunch the course will visit various institutions in Germany`s political center. Students will have the chance to discuss the topics from the morning sessions with international experts from political institutions, embassies and think tanks.

Student Profile

Students from different countries, academic levels and backgrounds, who are generally interested in European integration will benefit from each other in an intercultural and interdisciplinary learning process.

Former classes consisted of regular students and practitioners such as civil servants, communication experts, young politicians and even members of parliaments.

The course does not require special knowledge about European politics, law, history or culture, but participants should be interested in more than just their field of specialization.

In class participation, especially in the discussions with experts, is essential for the course success and plays an important role in grading.

Prerequisites

The course is designed for students with different academic backgrounds and a general interest in Europe. There are no specific prerequisites for this course.

Required language skills

The language of instruction is English. Language proficiency on an advanced Intermediate level (Mittelstufe II) is a prerequisite for participation. For orientation purposes, you can assess your language skills here (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR).

Course requirements

Attendance; Active participation in the seminar's discussions and discussions with experts; Oral and written presentation of a certain subject.

Grading

  • 40% Participation
  • 30% Oral presentations
  • 30% Final paper

Reading

A course reader will be provided.

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)

Instructor: Duygu Gürsel
Language of instruction:
English
Course type:
Subject course, B-Track
Contact hours:
48 (6 per day)
Course days
: Tuesday & Friday
ECTS credits
: 4
Course fee:
€ 1,100
Can be combined with all A-Track courses
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Course Description

Regarding transnational migration, the EU promotes a political reasoning between processes of consolidation and necessary conflict, between sovereignty and shared responsibility, between the right to define and delimit and the duty to negotiate. In ongoing economic crisis and facing unprecedented movements of people, the timeless normalcy of migration is often framed as crisis per se.

As the visibility of migration increases in various ways, migrants are often represented and imagined as a homogenous mass of ‘the other’. This leads to a problematic understanding of migration as something to be controlled and governed from a top-down perspective alone. But the respective processes of negotiation on migration policy, within and across the outer borders of the Union, take place not only between the official institutions of nation-states, but on all scales of European populations. They also take place from a bottom-up perspective in the centres and at the margins of societies alike.

Departing from diverse theories of migration, we will gain an overview of EU-level migration polity and recent migration- and border-management policies. We will analyse the conflicts, debates and discourses around the last years of increased immigration.

Scaling down, we will engage with the local authorities’ perspective in Berlin. Diving deeper down we will start to change perspective: How do local activists develop and implement their own ways of welcoming migrants? Where do migrants work and how are they represented in trade unions? In an encounter with refugees in Berlin, we will see how refugees themselves perceive EU-migration policies and what they make themselves of their public positioning as a ‘problem’ or as a ‘burden’ to European societies. Finally, focusing on the history of migrant struggles in Berlin, we will encounter migrants’ viewpoints, which reach beyond the usual framings of ‘the poor migrant’ as ‘passive victim’, as a threat or as the ‘(anti-)hero’ of globalization. We will encounter viewpoints on the EU, which will constructively criticize as well as graciously affirm the spirit of the Union. We will encounter viewpoints of solidarity.

Student Profile

This course is designed for all students having a personal, professional or political interest in a deeper and thus more differentiated understanding of transnational migration.

Prerequisites

No prior knowledge is required – but the willingness to think beyond the usual framings on migration and identity.

Required language skills

The language of instruction is English. Language proficiency on an advanced Intermediate level (Mittelstufe II) is a prerequisite for participation. For orientation purposes, you can assess your language skills here (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR).

Course Requirements

  • The basic conditions for the course are regular attendance, participation in discussions and a close reading of the literature provided.
  • In one page of continuous text, every course-day’s core discussions and conclusions are to be summarized and questions formulated in preparation for the next sessions.
  • Each student, together with fellow students, is required one time to prepare an input-presentation of a text in class (max. 10 min. each person).
  • The final examination (90 min.) will consist of answering 2-3 leading questions regarding the contents of the seminar in continuous text.

Grading

  • 40% Participation & Day's Summaries and Questions
  • 30% Text Presentation
  • 30% Final Examination  

Reading

A course reader will be provided at the first course meeting

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)

Instructor: Salome Minesashvili
Language of instruction:
English
Course type:
Subject course, B-Track
Contact hours:
48 (6 per day)
Course days
: Tuesday & Friday
ECTS credits
: 4
Course fee:
€ 1,100
Can be combined with all A-Track courses
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Course Description

This course is designed for students interested in understanding global issues and actors in a time of fast-moving political and social change. Students will learn the evolution of today’s international system as well as key issues and actors in contemporary politics. To learn how to assess these developments critically, the course will introduce the students to the main theories of International Relations (IR).

The field of IR studies the functioning of the international system and deals with the nature of the changing relations between states and with non-state actors. This course starts with discussing the classical theories of IR from Realism to contemporary attempts of theoretical bridge-building. Next, the course will deal with current political debates against the backdrop of the changing international system. Among others, topics to discuss include the role of the United Nations, the state of the world economy, and challenges to globalization. The course continues with examining the role of emerging powers such as China and Russia as well as non-state actors and key issues in contemporary IR such as terrorism or the environment; the goal is to discuss IR theories in the current political context. Finally, the course concludes with a reflection on the prospects for international politics.

In this course, students will learn political concepts and theories through lectures. To compare international political phenomena, each student has to introduce a current issue or actor in a short oral presentation. The students are expected to discuss theoretical questions about the political world in working groups making use of the current news on international politics. In addition, students will learn and practice how to voice their opinion and persuade their audience in an academic essay. Finally, the students will gain insight into daily international politics and IR research through field trips and meetings with IR scholars and international policy experts.

Student Profile

The course is designed for students with different academic backgrounds and a general interest in international politics.

Prerequisites

There are no specific prerequisites for this course.

Required language skills

The language of instruction is English. Language proficiency on an advanced Intermediate level (Mittelstufe II) is a prerequisite for participation. For orientation purposes, you can assess your language skills here (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR).

Course Requirements

All students are expected to attend and participate actively in class discussions of all readings and daily news. This means students should be prepared to a) summarize, evaluate and assess critically the significance of the readings, and b) provide information and discuss current topics of international politics.

Each student has to sign up for a short oral presentation. Presentation topics will be distributed at the first day of class.

In a final exam, students have to write a short essay in which they discuss a current issue of international politics applying a theory of IR. We will practice how to write an essay in class.

Grading

  • 40% Participation
  • 30% Oral Presentation
  • 30% Final Exam (essay)

Reading

A course reader will be provided.

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)

Instructor: Dr. Anja Richter
Language of instruction:
German
Course type:
Subject course, B-Track
Contact hours:
48 (6 per day)
Course days
: Tuesday & Friday
ECTS credits
: 4
Course fee:
€ 1,100
Can be combined with all A-Track courses
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Course Description

This course provides an overview of the history of German literature from the 18th to the 21st century.

Starting from the knowledge that the psychological sensitivities of an age are reflected in literature, and supported by reading and discussing representative texts - e.g. from Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Heinrich Heine, Franz Kafka, Bertolt Brecht or Ferdinand von Schirach - the focus of the seminar is based on the following questions: What desires, demands and utopias can be found in the literature? How influential are the developments of the history of thought, social upheavals and technological innovations on literary expression? What interplay exists between art, music and literature? Can fiction also be seen as inspiration for social changes? And: how do the respective authors corporate literary legacies into their own works?

A valid and living impression of literary development from the classical period to the present will not only be provided through texts, but also through film clips and field trips. For instance, we will visit the Deutsches Historisches Museum and obtain deeper insight into the art of the Romantic period with a tour through the Alte Nationalgalerie.

Student Profile

Aside from the language requirements, participants must not exhibit any special knowledge of German literature or history. The seminar is directed toward students of various majors who are interested in German literature and its historical connections from the classic period to the modern day.

Prerequisites

Language skills: Intermediate German B2/advanced level C1

Brief description of the B2 language level:

Able to understand the core content of complex texts on concrete and abstract themes; understands technical discussions in their own field. Able to spontaneously and fluently comprehend that a normal conversation with native speakers is easily possible with no great strain on either party. Able to clearly and precisely express themselves on a broad spectrum of subjects, express a standpoint on a topical question and provide the advantages and disadvantages of various possibilities.

Course Requirements

See Grading.

Grading

  • 30% Regular and active participation. Due to the seminar format, regular participation in the discussions is expected.
  • 25% Two brief essays (approx. 500 words = approx. 2 pages) on the various core themes of the subject.
  • 20% an oral presentation (approx. 15 minutes). The oral presentation should provide initial insight into the text in question, ask questions and formulate arguments, and stimulate discussion. The subjects will be assigned during the first week.
  • 25% a seminar paper of 6 pages.

Reading

Reader (will be made available at the beginning of the program).

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)

Instructor: Dr. Omar Kasmani
Language of instruction:
English
Course type:
Subject course, B-Track
Contact hours:
48 (6 per day)
Course days
: Tuesday & Friday
ECTS credits
: 4
Course fee:
€ 1,100
Can be combined with all A-Track courses
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Course Description

Urban studies and its discourse on the city draw in scholarship from fields as diverse as human geography, history, anthropology and the arts. Berlin, with its seemingly infinite possibilities for memory, imagination and creative self-fashioning, offers a rich analytical model. It is a city, which is as much a fixed place with a distinct topography as it is an imaginary that glides between remembering and forgetting. A measured understanding of the interplay of place, space and memory in Berlin’s cityscape is key for students who are eager to learn about the city’s many pasts and presents. FUBiS invites you to join us as we analyze and explore Berlin.

This seminar brings to the fore connections between Berlin's distinct topography, its radical histories, and its current trajectories as a political and cultural space. That cities are a complex assemblage – at best multiple constellations existing simultaneously – is enabled through perspectives on migration, queerness and religion for instance. In-class analysis and discussion of academic and literary texts about Berlin will prepare participants for course excursions. Our temporal-topographical inquiry will take us to a diverse set of historical sites, cultural places and neighborhoods in the city (such as the Berlin Wall Memorial, Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe, Schwules Museum, Sonnenallee).

We will conduct on-site discussions of these places/spaces in historical, spatial, social, and literary terms and record the urban with methodical observations, mapping and sound walks. Upon completing the course, students will have compiled a portfolio of short essays reflecting their critical reception of Berlin’s places/spaces as well as their gendered and embodied engagements, observations and memories of the city. The course not only enables an appreciation of how places/spaces are living archives of Berlin’s past and present, it also invites participants to create their own personal record of Berlin.

Learning Objectives:

After attending this seminar, students will

  • understand the topographical, social, and symbolic organization of place/space in an urban setting, Berlin in particular;
  • gain insight into the character of cities as multiple, contested and always-in-the making constellations
  • be able to reflect how access to the city is always subjective and contingent because it is primarily gendered, embodied, classed and racialized.
  • be familiar with how the city’s history continues to shape contemporary Berlin and its social imaginaries.

Student profile

Ideal for students of humanities and the arts, cultural, political, and social sciences.

Prerequisites

There are no prerequisites for this course.

Required language skills

The language of instruction is English. Language proficiency on an advanced Intermediate level (Mittelstufe II) is a prerequisite for participation. For orientation purposes, you can assess your language skills here (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR).

Course requirements

  • Active Participation
  • Seminar Times and Fieldwork
  • Presentation
  • Course Blod

Grading

  • 35% Active Participation
  • 30% Presentation
  • 35% Course Blod

Reading

A reader will be provided at the orientation meeting.

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)

Instructor: Kim Feser
Language of instruction:
English
Course type:
Subject course, B-Track
Contact hours:
48 (6 per day)
Course days
: Tuesday & Friday
ECTS credits
: 4
Course fee:
€ 1,100
Can be combined with all A-Track courses
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Course Description

In many ways, Berlin is a center for contemporary electronic music. This is primarily due to the strong connection between technological and aesthetic developments. Nightclubs, such as the Berghain, have a worldwide reputation for their sound systems, which allow a specific acoustic experience and encourage nightlong dancing and partying. Berlin-based companies such as Ableton and Native Instruments are global leaders in their music software, especially in the context of techno, electronica and electronic dance music. Many DJs and musicians´ market themselves or their tracks via blogs and streaming services. Particularly in the context of sound art, there are fairly strong parallels with media art.

Due to the key 'digital' aspects of such phenomena, we often speak of a 'Digital Age' in which Berlin plays a particular role in the field of music. However, the 'analog' phenomena are constantly growing, so that there is some debate over the beginning of a 'post-digital age'. This corresponds with an increasing focus both on the virtual and haptic dimension. Among other things, software companies have made strong efforts over the past years to develop their own hardware controllers for their computer programs in order to be able to better design musical processes manually.

Based on such phenomena, the course will explore the relationship between aesthetic trends and technological developments with the focus on the cultural and economic conditions in Berlin. Particular emphasis will be made on the past and present of techno, (experimental) electronica and electronic dance music. What makes Berlin a magnet not only for thrill-seeking club-goers, but also for DJs, musicians, producers and developers? How does this relate to the recent past of Berlin since the fall of the Berlin Wall, especially given the gentrification processes? To what extent is Berlin's creative scene at the same time internationally networked and can its conditions only be understood in a global context?

Beyond the Berlin perspective, the course examines the current conditions of production and consumption as well as the performance and distribution of music. How do legal/illegal file sharing and streaming services affect listening to music? What is changing in music culture through sampling, remixing, mashup and approaches to interactive music in video games? What opposing trends are out there?

In addition to the joint discussion of texts and film excerpts, excursions also provide an opportunity for an exchange with proven experts in the course subject areas.    

At the end of the course, the participants can elaborate on and present a topic (either alone or in a group) of their choice in the context of the general list of topics on the course.

Student profile

This course is intended for students of any disciplines. No prior music and technology background is required. The course aims to provide an insight into the relationship between aesthetic, social and technical developments regarding the topic 'Berlin and the Digital Music Age'. It also examines the conditions of the current production methods of electronic music, but does not teach the specific programming or composing of music.

Prerequisites

None

Required language skills

The language of instruction is English. Language proficiency on an advanced Intermediate level (Mittelstufe II) is a prerequisite for participation. For orientation purposes, you can assess your language skills here (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR).

Course requirements

  • Active Participation
  • Course schedule and excursions
  • Presentation with handouts
  • Course Presentation

Grading

  • Active participation: 40%
  • Presentation or a text (lecture with handout): 25%
  • Presentation of a chosen topic with a written summary at the end of the course: 35%

Reading

The list of references will be made available in a reader at the introductory lecture.

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)

Instructor: Prof. Dr. Frieder Otto Wolf
Language of instruction:
English
Course type:
Subject course, B-Track
Contact hours:
48 (6 per day)
Course days
: Tuesday & Friday
ECTS credits
: 4
Course fee:
€ 1,100
Can be combined with all A-Track courses
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Course Description

Philosophy has constituted a central element in the emergence of modern German culture. In the late 18th century, German philosophy participated in the broader European Enlightenment culture, which was in turn connected to the development of modern empirical science. Under the impression of the historical changes brought about by the French Revolution and by the ‘Industrial Revolution’ in Great Britain, a special constellation of German philosophy emerged at the end of the 18th century, which has deeply left its mark on subsequent philosophical thinking far beyond Germany.

This philosophy course addresses the historical reality of this ‘German moment of philosophy’ in two subsequent phases: In the first part, we follow the emergence and full deployment of German philosophy from its Kantian beginnings to Hegel’s grand but fragile synthesis, trying to understand its richness as well as its fragility. In a second part, we discuss the later renewal of German philosophy in the late 19th century and its historical tragedy in the 20th century. This will include a discussion of the new beginnings of philosophy since the mid-19th century, from Marx, and Nietzsche, via Frege to Husserl and Wittgenstein, who have been reacting to the scientific and political revolutions of the late 19th and early 20th century. Martin Heidegger as an established pro-Nazi philosopher and Max Horkheimer as the leading philosopher of the “Frankfurt School” driven into exile are studied as philosophers immersed into the Night of the 20th century.

Finally, post-World War II developments in philosophy (as exemplified by Jürgen Habermas) will be looked at as pathways out of the self-destructive turn the ‘German moment of philosophy’ in Germany had taken in the first decades of the 20th century, and as passages into an emerging world philosophy.

The course will be based upon contemporary attempts at rethinking a global philosophical perspective. The focus is on the tension between the Enlightenment heritage of a universalizing human philosophy and a national culture project, as well as on the tension between classicist rationalism and romantic emotionalism in its construction as a series of philosophical projects. From the perspective of a German version of the dialectics of the Enlightenment, the German philosophers of the 19th and 20th centuries will be studied in context - combining the reading of key texts with a reconstruction of their historical contexts and their interaction.

Student Profile

This course is open for students from all disciplines having a deep interest in Philosophy. Prior exposure to the field of philosophy will be helpful.

Prerequisites

Students should be able to speak and read English at the upper intermediate level (B2), preferably even higher. Prior experience with reading philosophical texts will be helpful.

Required language skills

The language of instruction is English. Language proficiency on an advanced Intermediate level (Mittelstufe II) is a prerequisite for participation. For orientation purposes, you can assess your language skills here (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR).

Course Requirements

Active Participation, Course Presentation, Midterm exam, Essay Paper

Grading

  • 20% Active Participation  
  • 25% Course Presentation
  • 25% Midterm Exam 
  • 30% Essay Paper

Reading

A course reader will be provided at the orientation meeting.

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)

Instructor: Dr. Karolina Golimowska
Language of instruction:
English
Course type:
Subject course, B-Track
Contact hours:
48 (6 per day)
Course days
: Tuesday & Friday
ECTS credits
: 4
Course fee:
€ 1,100
Can be combined with all A-Track courses
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Course Description

This course is meant to show Berlin as both, a setting of popular culture practices and phenomena as well as a protagonist and source of inspiration thereof. We will consider the many facets and dimensions of popular culture, including its history and various modes of ideology within. We will then see how these are intertwined with the cultural history of the city and its urban, social and political developments.

The course will cover a whole range of pop culture representations related to the city in different ways: film, television, comic books, fiction, music, paintings, street art etc. and will discuss their significance within the historical frame of reference as well as their international impact. We will also look at how these popular culture representations on one hand reflect the city and on the other contribute to the way Berlin is being imagined, perceived and remembered.

Studying the history of popular culture, students will be able to see various cultural disciplines and practices as interlinked and as having a mutual influence on one another. Providing theoretical as well as practical approaches, the course aims at developing critical thinking and embracing popular culture representations in the context of a given time period and political setting. It shows artistic and cultural practices as related to one another in time and space and therefore also allows for a comparative and interdisciplinary perspective.    

Student Profile

This course is open to all students interested in the critical study of popular culture with a special focus on Berlin. No previous experience with (pop) cultural studies is necessary.

Prerequisites

Students have to be fluent in English at an at least advanced intermediate level.

Required language skills

The language of instruction is English. Language proficiency on an advanced Intermediate level (Mittelstufe II) is a prerequisite for participation. For orientation purposes, you can assess your language skills here (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR).

Course Requirements

  • Consistent preparation, regular attendance, and active participation in all course activities including field trips: the more you contribute, the better the class is going to be.
  • An in-class presentation of appx. 10-15 minutes including questions to guide the session’s reading.
  • Final paper on a topic related to the course.

Grading

  • 30% Participation
  • 30% Oral presentations
  • 40% Final Paper

Reading

A course reader will be provided at the first course meeting.

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)

Instructor: Steffen Krämer
Language of instruction:
English
Course type:
Subject course, B-Track
Contact hours:
48 (6 per day)
Course days
: Tuesday & Thursday
ECTS credits
: 4
Course fee:
€ 1,100
Can be combined with all B-Track courses
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Course Description

The notions of ‘media’, ‘medium’, ‘mediation’, ‘medialization’ or ‘mediatization’ have occupied authors in the humanities for decades and have led to the emergence of new university programs as much as they initiated debates about the boundaries of already existing disciplines. Whereas some celebrated the plurality of models and concepts in the new program of media studies, others called for more distinction or mapped the different positions within the field. For example, differences were found between German media theory and Anglo-American medium theory, and some authors would even refer of a ‘Berlin brand of media theory’.

In this course, we will collectively scrutinize this labelling and widen the frame by discussing different historical and contemporary examples of research about media and communication in Berlin and Germany. We will focus on the period from the 1920s onwards and increasingly move towards the present. As we go along, we will build bridges between historical positions and contemporary ones, providing a sense for continuities and discontinuities in media theoretical positions and formats of media critique. Through the collective experience and critical discussion of texts, films and field trips, students will gain a wide understanding of the problems and objects of media-theoretical inquiry and of its historical and geographical context.

The overarching questions this course seeks to answer are: "What are common themes and issues in media theory and media critique?", "How did they develop in or refer to the particular context of Berlin?"

Altogether, this course has four intents: It serves as an introduction to problems in media studies for newcomers; it particularly focuses on media studies in Germany and Berlin for those already more familiar with questions in the field; it enquires about Berlin as both production site and object of media research; and it seeks to attenuate the labelling of a Berlin brand of media studies.

Student profile

This course is suitable for everyone who is interested in cultural, social, and philosophical theories about media and communication. For those who already have a background in media studies or related disciplines, the course might provide additional information about the German and Berlin context of the discipline. For all others, the course might serve as a general albeit selective introduction into repeating themes of media studies. The course is interdisciplinary in nature and particularly suited for undergraduate students from the fields of cultural studies, communication studies, comparative literature, and art history.

Prerequisites

A general openness towards the engagement with conceptual abstractions and artistic practices is expected, but no prior knowledge is required.

Required language skills

The language of instruction is English. Language proficiency on an advanced Intermediate level (Mittelstufe II) is a prerequisite for participation. For orientation purposes, you can assess your language skills here (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR).

Course Requirements

You are required to attend and actively participate during the sessions, to introduce into one of the readings and organize its discussion, and to write an essay at the end of the course.

Grading

  • Attendance and participation: 20%
  • Text presentation and moderation: 40%
  • Final course paper: 40%

Reading

A course reader will be provided at the orientation meeting.

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)

Instructor: Dr. Stefano de Bosio
Language of instruction:
English
Course type:
Subject course, B-Track
Contact hours:
48 (6 per day)
Course days
: Tuesday & Friday
ECTS credits
: 4
Course fee:
€ 1,100
Can be combined with all A-Track courses
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Course Description

This course explores European art from the 15th to the 20th century with a particular focus on the travels of artists between urban centers like Florence, Rome, Venice, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Paris, London, and Berlin. The aim is to analyze how mobility contributed through the centuries to shape local identities as well as European visual cultural traditions and styles common to different countries.

The course will present iconic moments of the history of the arts in Europe by drawing a special attention to episodes of cultural exchanges and hybridization that arose from travelling artworks as well as from artists’ travels. From the impact of Flemish art in 15th century Italy, to the stays of artists like Raphael and Michelangelo in the early 16th-century papal Rome; from the rise of genre painting in the Flanders and the Dutch Republic during the Age of Explorations, to the ‘painters of modern life’ in 19th-century Paris, and the European network of the Avant-gardes in the 1910s-1920s, we will analyze the artworks and their authors in relation to the different historical contexts and the places of their creation. Recurrent will be the focus on the complex interplay between artists and patrons, between local traditions, individual creativity and the broader social, political and cultural contexts in which artworks and buildings were produced.

Students will gain understanding of the main art movements and relevant artists from the Renaissance to the postwar period and the special role played by travels in giving shape to a European cultural space. Visits to the outstanding collections of Berlin museums will allow the participants to study original artifacts and to learn how to look closely at works of art.

Student Profile

The course addresses students of any subject.

Prerequisites

An elementary knowledge of European history is welcome but not necessary.

Required language skills

The language of instruction is English. Language proficiency on an advanced Intermediate level (Mittelstufe II) is a prerequisite for participation. For orientation purposes, you can assess your language skills here (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR).

Course Requirements

Regular attendance and active participation, mid-term oral presentation and final written exam.

Grading

30% Attendance & participation

30% Mid-term presentation (oral presentation of a work in Berlin museums)

40% Final Exam

Reading

A course reader will be provided at the orientation meeting.

Recommended Course Combinations (Selection)

C-Track Language Courses

Language of instruction: German
Course type:
Language course, C-Track
Contact hours:
120 (6 per day)
Course days
: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday,Thursday & Friday
ECTS credits
: 6
Course fee:
€ 1,650
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Student Profile

This course is designed for the beginner student with no previous knowledge of German. This course is intensive and is intended for dedicated, highly self-motivated students who will take responsibility for their learning.

Course Objectives

Within four weeks, this course will help you to develop basic competences in listening, speaking, reading and writing as well as a basic knowledge of the German culture.

  • By the end of the course you will be able to deal with everyday situations in a German-speaking environment and to conduct simple conversations.
  • You will have developed reading strategies that allow you to understand simple newspaper and magazine articles as well as short literary texts.
  • In addition, you will learn to write, revise and proofread short texts in German.
  • Finally, you will be able to understand discussions on familiar topics.

Textbook

studio [21] Grundstufe A1: Gesamtband. Das Deutschbuch, Hermann Funk, Christina Kuhn, Laura Nielsen, Kerstin Rische, Cornelsen Verlag, 2015.

Literary texts and supplemental materials in consultation with the course instructor.

Daily Lesson and Excursion

Monday through Friday are lessons. On two class days during the term you will go on a course-related excursion.

Attendance

Each class consists of six teaching modules (45 minutes each). If you miss 13 modules (unexcused), your entire course grade will drop by one grade. Coming more than 20 minutes late counts as missing a module (this also applies to excursion days). If you come late to class six times (up to 20 minutes) your entire course grade will also drop by one grade. If you miss 34 modules, you will fail the class.

Active Participation

We expect committed and consistent interest in the acquisition of the German language. You will prove this by participating constructively and productively in the lessons and excursions, completing homework assignments and being prepared for every class. Every student is expected to respect the ideas and comments of his/her peers.

Oral Presentation

You will prepare two three-minute oral presentations. It is important that you speak freely rather than reading the oral presentation and that you keep to the time allowed.

Essay

In this course you will write two essays (font size 12, double-spaced, 100 – 150 words). Your teacher will mark potential errors as such and you are required to correct your essay and hand in a second corrected version. For the first version of your essay you can obtain a maximum of 50 points; for the second version you will receive up to 50% of the missing points.

When writing your essay, you will strive first and foremost for clarity (organization and style) and accuracy (grammar and syntax).

Reflective Journal

Throughout the term you will write various journal entries – independently or on given topics – to reflect on certain aspects of your stay in Berlin. Your instructor will collect these creative exercises and comment the content. However, no corrections will be made. The aim of the journal is that you develop awareness of the language(s) surrounding you.

Midterm and Final Exam

You will take a midterm and a final exam consisting of the following sections: listening comprehension, vocabulary, grammar, reading comprehension and composition based on course themes.

Group Project

Together with two or three peers you will prepare a creative and linguistically demanding oral presentation of approximately 10 minutes about your impressions of Berlin (funny, bizarre, interesting facts etc.). The projects (sketches, parodies, PowerPoint presentations, movies, songs, poems etc.) will be presented on the last day of class. Most importantly, every group member should play an active role in the presentation, i.e. should receive an equal amount of speaking time during the presentation.

Evaluation

  • Active participation and homework   300 points
  • Oral presentation (2 à 50 pts)          100 points
  • Essay (2 à 50 pts)                          100 points
  • Reflective Journal                            100 points
  • Midterm exam                                150 points
  • Final exam                                     150 points
  • Group project                                 100 points

Maximum score: 1,000 points

Language of instruction: German
Course type:
Language course, C-Track
Contact hours:
120 (6 per day)
Course days
: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday,Thursday & Friday
ECTS credits
: 6
Course fee:
€ 1,650
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Student Profile

This course is designed for beginners with basic knowledge of German. This course is intensive and is intended for dedicated, highly self-motivated students who will take responsibility for their learning.

Course Objectives

This course will help you to expand your competences in listening, speaking, reading and writing within four weeks, deepen your knowledge of grammar as well as your knowledge of the German culture.

  • By the end of the four-week course you will be able to deal with everyday situations in a German-speaking environment and to conduct simple conversations.
  • You will have developed reading strategies that allow you to understand simple newspaper and magazine articles as well as short literary texts more detailed.
  • In addition, you will improve your essay writing skills, which means you will be able to write short texts on different topics, revise and proofread them.
  • Finally, you will be able to understand discussions on familiar topics more detailed.

Textbook

studio [21] Grundstufe A2: Gesamtband. Das Deutschbuch, Hermann Funk, Christina Kuhn, Cornelsen Verlag, 2015.

Literary texts and supplemental materials in consultation with the course instructor.

Daily Lesson and Excursion

Monday through Friday are lessons. On two class days during the term you will go on a course-related excursion.

Attendance

Each class consists of six teaching modules (45 minutes each). If you miss 13 modules (unexcused), your entire course grade will drop by one grade. Coming more than 20 minutes late counts as missing a module (this also applies to excursion days). If you come late to class six times (up to 20 minutes) your entire course grade will also drop by one grade. If you miss 34 modules, you will fail the class.

Active Participation

We expect committed and consistent interest in the acquisition of the German language. You will prove this by participating constructively and productively in the lessons and excursions, completing homework assignments and being prepared for every class. Every student is expected to respect the ideas and comments of his/her peers.

Oral Presentation

You will prepare two five-minute oral presentations. It is important that you speak freely rather than reading the oral presentation and that you keep to the time allowed.

Essay

In this course you will write two essays (font size 12, double-spaced, 150 – 200 words). Your teacher will mark potential errors as such and you are required to correct your essay and hand in a second corrected version. For the first version of your essay you can obtain a maximum of 50 points; for the second version you will receive up to 50% of the missing points. When writing your essay, you will strive first and foremost for clarity (organization and style) and accuracy (grammar and syntax).

Reflective Journal

Throughout the term you will write various journal entries – independently or on given topics – to reflect on certain aspects of your stay in Berlin. Your instructor will collect these creative exercises and comment the content. However, no corrections will be made. The aim of the journal is that you develop awareness of the language(s) surrounding you.

Midterm and Final Exam

You will take a midterm and a final exam consisting of the following sections: listening comprehension, vocabulary, grammar, reading comprehension and composition based on course themes.

Group Project

Together with two or three peers you will prepare a creative and linguistically demanding oral presentation of approximately 10 minutes about your impressions of Berlin (funny, bizarre, interesting facts etc.). The projects (sketches, parodies, PowerPoint presentations, movies, songs, poems etc.) will be presented on the last day of class. Most importantly, every group member should play an active role in the presentation, i.e. should receive an equal amount of speaking time during the presentation.

Evaluation

  • Active participation and homework 300 points
  • Oral presentation (2 à 50 pts) 100 points
  • Essay (2 à 50 pts) 100 points
  • Reflective journal 100 points
  • Midterm exam 150 points
  • Final exam 150 points
  • Group project 100 points

Maximum score: 1,000 points

Language of instruction: German
Course type:
Language course, C-Track
Contact hours:
120 (6 per day)
Course days
: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday,Thursday & Friday
ECTS credits
: 6
Course fee:
€ 1,650
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Student Profile

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed the basic level of German and who have a sound knowledge of German at the A2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. This course is intensive and is intended for dedicated, highly self-motivated students who will take responsibility for their learning.

Course Objectives

Within four weeks, this course will help you to expand your competences in listening, speaking, reading and writing as well as strengthen your knowledge of grammar, while emphasizing self-correction. You will also expand your knowledge of the German culture and analyze and interpret cultural, political, and historical topics in German-speaking countries and compare them with your own cultural background.

  • By the end of the four-week course you will have developed and regularly use new strategies for language acquisition.
  • You will be able to engage in detailed discussions on above mentioned topics.
  • Furthermore, you will have developed reading strategies that will allow you to understand different text types in detail.
  • In addition, you will improve your essay writing skills, i.e. you will be able to write short texts on different topics, revise and proofread them.

Textbook

studio [21] Grundstufe B1: Gesamtband. Das Deutschbuch, Hermann Funk, Christina Kuhn, Britta Winzer-Kiontke, Cornelsen Verlag, 2015.

Literary texts and supplemental materials in consultation with the course instructor.

Daily Lesson and Excursion

Monday through Friday are lessons. On two class days during the term you will go on a course-related excursion.

Attendance

Each class consists of six teaching modules (45 minutes each). If you miss 13 modules (unexcused), your entire course grade will drop by one grade. Coming more than 20 minutes late counts as missing a module (this also applies to excursion days). If you come late to class six times (up to 20 minutes) your entire course grade will also drop by one grade. If you miss 34 modules, you will fail the class.

Active Participation

We expect committed and consistent interest in the acquisition of the German language. You will prove this by participating constructively and productively in the lessons and excursions, completing homework assignments and being prepared for every class. Every student is expected to respect the ideas and comments of his/her peers.

Oral Presentation

You will prepare a five-minute and a ten-minute oral presentation. In one of them you will introduce and explain a certain topic related to Berlin. It is important that you prepare and explain for your presentation relevant vocabulary beforehand (max. 5 – 7) and that you give your peers a specific assignment. Furthermore, it is important that you speak freely rather than reading the oral presentation and that you keep to the time allowed.

Essay

In this course you will write two essays (font size 12, double-spaced, 200 – 250 words). Your teacher will mark potential errors as such and you are required to correct your essay and hand in a second corrected version. For the first version of your essay you can obtain a maximum of 50 points; for the second version you will receive up to 50% of the missing points.

When writing your essay, you will strive first and foremost for clarity (organization and style) and accuracy (grammar and syntax). You are encouraged to incorporate complex constructions, but please concentrate on syntactic and grammatical accuracy.

Reflective Journal

Throughout the term you will write various journal entries – independently or on given topics – to reflect on certain aspects of your stay in Berlin. Your instructor will collect these creative exercises and comment the content. However, no corrections will be made. The aim of the journal is that you learn how to express a critical and self-reflective position in a linguistically creative way.

Midterm and Final Exam

You will take a midterm and a final exam consisting of the following sections: listening comprehension, vocabulary, grammar, reading comprehension and composition based on course themes.

Group Project

Together with two or three peers you will prepare a creative and linguistically demanding oral presentation of approximately 10 minutes about your impressions of Berlin (funny, bizarre, interesting facts etc.). The projects (sketches, parodies, PowerPoint presentations, movies, songs, poems etc.) will be presented on the last day of class. Most importantly, every group member should play an active role in the presentation, i.e. should receive an equal amount of speaking time during the presentation.

Evaluation

  • Active participation and homework 300 points
  • Oral presentation (2 à 50 pts) 100 points
  • Essay (2 à 50 pts) 100 points
  • Reflective journal 100 points
  • Midterm exam 150 points
  • Final exam 150 points
  • Group project 100 points

Maximum score: 1,000 points

Language of instruction: German
Course type:
Language course, C-Track
Contact hours:
120 (6 per day)
Course days
: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday,Thursday & Friday
ECTS credits
: 6
Course fee:
€ 1,650
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Student Profile

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed the basic level and the first part of the intermediate level of German and who have a sound knowledge of German at the B1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. This course is intensive and is intended for dedicated, highly self-motivated students who will take responsibility for their learning.

Course Objectives

This course will help you to expand your competences in speaking and writing within four weeks, while emphasizing self-correction. Furthermore, it will help you to increase your vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and develop effective reading and listening strategies.

In addition, you will analyze and interpret cultural, political, and historical topics in German-speaking countries and compare them with your own cultural background.

  • By the end of the four-week course you will have developed and regularly use new strategies for language acquisition.
  • You will be able to engage in detailed discussions on above mentioned topics.
  • Furthermore, you will have developed reading strategies that will allow you to understand different text types in detail.
  • In addition, you will improve your essay writing skills, i.e. you will be able to write short texts on different topics, revise and proofread them.

Textbook

Sicher! B2-Kursbuch, Dr. Michaela Perlmann-Balme, Susanne Schwalb, Hueber Verlag, 2014.

Literary texts and supplemental materials in consultation with the course instructor.

Daily Lesson and Excursion

Monday through Friday are lessons. On two class days during the term you will go on a course-related excursion.

Attendance

Each class consists of six teaching modules (45 minutes each). If you miss 13 modules (unexcused), your entire course grade will drop by one grade. Coming more than 20 minutes late counts as missing a module (this also applies to excursion days). If you come late to class six times (up to 20 minutes) your entire course grade will also drop by one grade. If you miss 34 modules, you will fail the class.

Active Participation

We expect committed and consistent interest in the acquisition of the German language. You will prove this by participating constructively and productively in the lessons and excursions, completing homework assignments and being prepared for every class. Every student is expected to respect the ideas and comments of his/her peers.

Oral Presentation

You will prepare a five-minute and a ten-minute oral presentation. In one of them you will introduce and explain a certain topic related to Berlin. It is important that you prepare and explain for your presentation relevant vocabulary beforehand (max. 10) and that you give your peers a specific assignment. Furthermore, it is important that you speak freely rather than reading the oral presentation and that you keep to the time allowed.

Essay

In this course you will write two essays (font size 12, double-spaced, 250 – 300 words). Your teacher will mark potential errors as such and you are required to correct your essay and hand in a second corrected version. For the first version of your essay you can obtain a maximum of 50 points; for the second version you will receive up to 50% of the missing points.

When writing your essay, you will strive first and foremost for clarity (organization and style) and accuracy (grammar and syntax). You are encouraged to incorporate complex constructions, but please concentrate on syntactic and grammatical accuracy.

Reflective Journal

Throughout the term you will write various journal entries – independently or on given topics – to reflect on certain aspects of your stay in Berlin. Your instructor will collect these creative exercises and comment the content. However, no corrections will be made. The aim of the journal is that you learn how to express a critical and self-reflective position in a linguistically creative way.

Midterm and Final Exam

You will take a midterm and a final exam consisting of the following sections: listening comprehension, vocabulary, grammar, reading comprehension and composition based on course themes.

Group Project

Together with two or three peers you will prepare a creative and linguistically demanding oral presentation of approximately 10 minutes about your impressions of Berlin (funny, bizarre, interesting facts etc.). The projects (sketches, parodies, PowerPoint presentations, movies, songs, poems etc.) will be presented on the last day of class. Most importantly, every group member should play an active role in the presentation, i.e. should receive an equal amount of speaking time during the presentation.

Evaluation

  • Active participation and homework 300 points
  • Oral presentation (2 à 50 pts) 100 points
  • Essay (2 à 50 pts) 100 points
  • Reflective journal 100 points
  • Midterm exam 150 points
  • Final exam 150 points
  • Group project 100 points

Maximum score: 1,000 points

Language of instruction: German
Course type:
Language course, C-Track
Contact hours:
120 (6 per day)
Course days
: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday,Thursday & Friday
ECTS credits
: 6
Course fee:
€ 1,650
  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Student Profile

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed the intermediate level of German and who have a sound knowledge of German at the B2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. This course is intensive and is intended for dedicated, highly self-motivated students who will take responsibility for their learning.

Course Objectives

The course aims to deepen your competence in speaking and writing and to expand and refine your vocabulary usage, so that you are able to express and discuss ideas, opinions and information at the academic level. Special attention is given to the consistent use of self-correction. Furthermore, the course helps you to develop effective reading and listening strategies and deepen your knowledge of grammar structures.

In addition, you will analyze and interpret cultural, political, and historical topics in German-speaking countries and compare them with your own cultural background.

  • By the end of the four-week course you will have developed and regularly use new strategies for language acquisition.
  • You will have improved your ability to choose the right linguistic register for different situations, topics and communication partners.
  • You will be able to lead and participate in academic discussions about certain course-related topics.
  • In addition, you will expand and refine your essay writing skills, i.e. you will be able to write, revise and proofread essays that meet the standards of academic writing.

Textbook

studio: Die Mittelstufe. Deutsch als Fremdsprache C1, Christina Kuhn, Britta Winzer-Kiontke, Cornelsen Verlag, 2015.

Literary texts and supplemental materials in consultation with the course instructor.

Daily Lesson and Excursion

Monday through Friday are lessons. On two class days during the term you will go on a course-related excursion.

Attendance

Each class consists of six teaching modules (45 minutes each). If you miss 13 modules (unexcused), your entire course grade will drop by one grade. Coming more than 20 minutes late counts as missing a module (this also applies to excursion days). If you come late to class six times (up to 20 minutes) your entire course grade will also drop by one grade. If you miss 34 modules, you will fail the class.

Active Participation

We expect committed and consistent interest in the acquisition of the German language. You will prove this by participating constructively and productively in the lessons and excursions, completing homework assignments and being prepared for every class. Every student is expected to respect the ideas and comments of his/her peers.

Oral Presentation

You will prepare a five-minute and a ten-minute oral presentation. You are also required to prepare a handout for your peers listing unfamiliar vocabulary (max. 20) and posing questions. Furthermore, it is important that you speak freely rather than reading the oral presentations and that you keep to the time allowed.

Essay

In preparation for your final paper, you will compose an essay in 12-font and double spaced (300-350 words). Your teacher will mark potential errors as such and you are required to correct your essay and hand in a second corrected version. For the first version of your essay you can obtain a maximum of 100 points; for the second version you will receive up to 50% of the missing points.

When writing your essay you will strive first and foremost for clarity (organization and style) and accuracy (grammar and syntax). You are encouraged to incorporate complex constructions, but please concentrate on syntactic and grammatical accuracy.

In addition, you will write a journal entry reflection on your essay and the writing process. This reflection together with your instructor’s suggestions and comments will help you to expand your essay into a research paper for the final project.

Reflective Journal

Throughout the term you will write various journal entries – independently or on given topics – to reflect on certain aspects of your stay in Berlin, e.g. question personal impressions, compare historical or contemporary phenomena, reflect on certain topics discussed in class, etc. Your instructor will collect these creative exercises and comment the content. However, no corrections will be made. The aim of the journal is that you learn how to express a critical and self-reflective position in a linguistically creative way.

Midterm Exam

You will take a midterm exam consisting of the following sections: listening comprehension, vocabulary, grammar, reading comprehension and composition based on course themes.

Final Project

The final project will be a four-page written research paper (font size 12, double-spaced) and a five-minute in-class presentation. The final paper has to meet the standards of academic writing. In terms of content this means that a certain topic has to be investigated systematically and the results have to be presented in a structured and logical way. In terms of form it means that you keep to one single citation style and that you include all the sources you used for your research paper in a reference-list.

You will complete your final paper by executing the following steps:

  • Based on your essay you will write an outline, which will be commented by your instructor.
  • Then you will write your final paper, which will be due by the beginning of the final week of the course.
  • In class you will proofread your final paper together with your peers and check for errors in terms of content and form.
  • You will have the opportunity to revise your final paper before handing it in.

At the last day of class you will present your results in a five-minute presentation. It is important that you speak freely rather than reading your presentation and that you keep to the time allowed.

Evaluation

  • Active participation and homework 300 points
  • Oral presentation (2 à 50 pts) 100 points
  • Essay 100 points
  • Reflective journal 100 points
  • Midterm exam 150 points
  • Final project 250 points (200 final paper + 50 presentation)

Maximum score: 1,000 points

D-Track Multi-City Courses

Instructor: Dr. Matthias Vollmer
Language of instruction:
English
Course type:
Subject course, D-Track
Contact hours (total):
48
Course days
: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday & Friday
ECTS credits
: 4
Course fee: € 1,632 (incl. program fee and housing)

The course is part of a Multi-City Program in cooperation with Utrecht Summer School and the Dutch University Institute for Art History in Florence.

  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Course Description

The course will introduce Berlin’s outstanding art collections, with their wide range of masterpieces from late medieval times to the present day. We shall focus throughout on the particular circumstances that shaped the production and reception of German art, especially during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. During this long period, the formation of a German nation state and the problematic notion of a German national identity became intimately connected to the question of a German style and artistic ‘expression’. A special focus will be given to the "Art of the two Germanys" between 1945 and 1989. We shall explore Germany’s vibrant art history by focusing on works by artists like Martin Schongauer and Albrecht Dürer, Caspar David Friedrich, Karl Friedrich Schinkel and Adolph Menzel, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Otto Dix, Joseph Beuys and Anselm Kiefer.

Field trips include the following museums and galleries in Berlin: Deutsches Historisches Museum, the Gemäldegalerie, the Museum of Photography, the Brücke Museum, the Nationalgalleries, and the Hamburger Bahnhof Museum.

Student Profile

In principle, the course is open to all students regardless of their field of study, but primarily it addresses art history students. An elementary knowledge of art and art history is advantageous, but not obligatory.

Prerequisites

None

Required language skills

The language of instruction is English. Language proficiency on an advanced Intermediate level (Mittelstufe II) is a prerequisite for participation. For orientation purposes, you can assess your language skills here (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR).

Course Requirements

Regular attendance & active participation, mid-term and final exam

Grading

  • 50% Attendance & Participation
  • 20% Mid-term Exam
  • 30% Final Exam

Literature

A course reader will be provided.

Instructor: Dr. Stefan Cetkovic
Language of instruction:
English
Course type:
Subject course, D-Track
Contact hours (total):
48
Course days
: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday & Friday
ECTS credits
: 4
Course fee: € 1,632 (incl. program fee and housing)

The course is part of a Multi-City Program in cooperation with Utrecht Summer School and Royal Netherlands Institute Rome.

  • Syllabus (printable PDF incl. day-to-day schedule)

Course Description

This course provides an overview of the political, socio-economic, and cultural developments that shaped Europe in the long 20th century. Many deeply impacting developments occurred over the course of the 20th century: Two World Wars were fought, the birth of the European Union and the fall of Communism, just to name a few. Being such a crucial city in Europe’s history in the 20th century, Berlin is the most logical location for this course. Special emphasis will also be given to Germany's role in the middle of the continent and to the historical origins of the European Union and its present state. The city of Berlin, with all its tangible historical remains, will be dealt with as a city of former crisis with great promises for a better future.

In this course we will try to identify the democratic values that have shaped the rebirth of Europe and discuss the challenges with which present-day Europe is faced. The course will reflect on Europe's place in the global, multi-polar world of the 21st century.

Several excursions will be organised in which you will visit some key historic sites in the city.

Student Profile

The course is open to undergraduate students from different fields of study with an interest in culture, society and politics.

Prerequisites

The course requires a minimum language proficiency of B2 in English. A general background in the social sciences may help, but no specific expertise is required.

Required language skills

The language of instruction is English. Language proficiency on an advanced Intermediate level (Mittelstufe II) is a prerequisite for participation. For orientation purposes, you can assess your language skills here (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR).

Course Requirements

Students must attend classes, actively engage in class discussions, and regularly contribute ideas to the class to successfully complete this course.

Grading

  • Active participation: 30%
  • Midcourse exam: 30%
  • Final exam: 40%

Reading

The reading material for the course will be provided.


Class times

WeekdaysMonday, Tuesday,
Thursday and Friday
Wednesday
Teaching hours

  9:00 - 10:30 am
11:00 am - 12:30 pm
2:00 - 3:30 pm

9:00 am - 3:30 pm
(on field trip days adaptation of class times possible)